100 Million Americans are in Chains and Joe Biden Wants to Keep them that Way

I love Joe Biden. The more he opens his mouth, the more people see how bankrupt this administration is. Did President Obama pick Biden to make himself look and sound better to the American people?

The latest foot in mouth disease statement came when he was addressing a crowd in Virginia. According to Biden, in Mitt Romney’s first 100 days in office (from Biden’s lips to God’s ears), “he’s going to let the big banks once again write their own rules — unchain Wall Street. They gonna put y’all back in chains.” Danville, Virginia, where Biden was speaking, is nearly 50 percent black.

“Back in chains” and “y’all” sounds a bit racist to me. You may recall that former presidential candidate Ross Perot got slapped down when he said “you people” while addressing a black audience. But it’s always double-standard-time at the Democrats’ house. The Obama administration went out of its way to support Biden’s racist comment. Obama’s deputy campaign manager Stephanie Cutter said, “The bottom line is that we have no problem with those comments.”

It’s too bad that Biden’s largely black audience didn’t understand that their support of the Democrat worldview has made them as dependent as when their slave ancestors had to depend on the scraps their slave owners let them have.

Black Democrats at the NAACP didn’t have any problem with the video depicting Allen West — who is black — hitting a white woman. Black men as a threat to white women has always been viewed as racial stereotyping. I guess it’s OK to depict a black man that way as long as he’s not a liberal Democrat.

In addition to the racial overtones of Biden’s comments there’s the underlying tragedy in the statement. More than 100 million Americans are already in chains, metaphorically speaking, and they were put in that condition by Democrat social and economic policies.

Wealth transfer subsidies have led to the immobility of the poor, the breakup of the family, and dependency on government programs. There is little incentive to leave an area, since the risks are seen as being too great. Star Parker, once trapped in the welfare cycle, writes:

Thirty-five years of Great Society social engineering have forced the disadvantaged to live under the control of the federal government. Politicians control their housing, food supply, schooling, wages, and transportation. A centralized government makes decisions about their childcare, healthcare, and retirement.1

After the destruction that Hurricane Katrina brought, some of the poorest of the poor in New Orleans were forced to leave the place they called home and taken to cities where they could begin a new life. Black migration is not new, but it has never been this sudden. Nicole Singleton, a former resident of New Orleans because of Katrina, was about to be flown to Minnesota. “I don’t know a thing about Minnesota,” said the 33-year-old evacuee who worked on and off steaming sheets and styling hair. “There’s nothing here for me, and this is my chance to start again.”2 She’s not alone.

The evacuees, local governments, and Washington politicians have a choice. They can re-engineer the same failed welfare policies that trapped and warehoused the poor in New Orleans and the surrounding parishes, or they can advance a strategy of personal, family, social, educational, moral, and economic redevelopment. This is as good a time as any to dismantle the welfare state.

Let’s work to defeat Obama and Biden in November. 100 million Americans are still in chains and Joe Biden wants to keep them that way because Democrats need their votes.

  1. Star Parker, Uncle Sam’s Plantation: How Big Government Enslaves America’s Poor and What We Can Do About It (Nashville: WND Books, 2003), 72. []
  2. Steven Gray, “A Mother of Six Gets a Chance at a New Life In Minnesota,” The Wall Street Journal (September 8, 2005), B1. []