51st State Gains Public Support

In June, rumors began to float out of the plains of northeastern Colorado about the possibility of secession.  The idea of forming North Colorado became the talk of the counties in the flatlands east of the Rocky Mountains.  The major industries of this corner of the state are agricultural and energy – oil and gas.

The residents are growing unhappy with the way liberal Democrats have been running the state.  They don’t like all of the new anti-gun laws that were passed and they’re not that happy about the green energy laws the liberals passed either.

As difficult as secession is, it isn’t an impossible task.  A group of political leaders from 11 of the northeastern counties have been meeting and discussing the possibility and if it is worth pursuing.  Last Thursday night, the first public hearing on the matter was held in Weld County, whose commissioners are spearheading the secession movement.

Barbara Kickmeyer, one of the Weld County Commissioners involved in the secession movement said:

“We believe there’s an attack on oil and gas.  We believe there’s an attack on agriculture. I don’t think those folks who are making laws down in Denver understand any of it.”

Her words were echoed by another commissioner, Sean Conway who said:

“People when they feel disenfranchised and they feel their voices aren’t being heard. That’s a problem in a representative form of government.”

On July 18, residents showed up at the Phillips County Commissioner’s meeting and expressed their support of placing secession on the November ballot.  The issue will probably go on the November ballot in Cheyenne County.

Secession is a long and difficult process, but in lieu of what the Democrats have done to the state of Colorado, I’m pulling for them to succeed in their effort to secede.