Amanda Thatcher And St. Paul Remind Us The War Is Not Over

I don’t know much at all about Margaret Thatcher’s grand-daughter (other than some athletic accomplishments). Amanda Thatcher’s present character and future actions are a mystery to me. So my wish that she become an international antidote to Chelsea Clinton’s career ambitions is probably just an anarchist dream.

But hearing her speaking the words of the Apostle Paul standing in an ancient church (ancient by this American’s standards, anyway) reading from an old traditional translation of the Bible that makes no gender-inclusive concessions, before the dead body of a fallen warrior—I found all that strangely inspiring.

The choice of the text took me by surprise. If I was going to read a quotation from the Apostle Paul, I would consider something like Second Timothy 4:6-8 as being far more apt for the former Prime Minister:

“For I am now ready to be offered, and the time of my departure is at hand. I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith: Henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, shall give me at that day: and not to me only, but unto all them also that love his appearing.”

That seemed more like the kind of farewell passage one would read at a funeral. Perhaps it was read by the clergy at some other point in the service. I don’t know.

What I do know is that Amanda read a much different passage. Instead of contemplating Margaret Thatcher’s passing, her granddaughter told us to stand–to not stop the fight and to keep praying. She read Ephesians 6:10-18:

I have to confess, I have found it easy to get dissatisfied with the career of Margaret Thatcher (along with Ronald Reagan) for not having accomplished a more definitive victory against statism and in favor of privatization. Listening to Amanda’s charge from the Apostle Paul makes me wonder if, in addition to being cynical and judgmental, I am just being way too lazy.

It is too easy to hope that some champion will do all the heavy lifting and change the world so that you don’t have to face opposition. Margaret Thatcher, like Ronald Reagan, faced a legacy of economic interventionism and statism that had been growing since before either of them was born. It is completely irrational to think they are going to save the world during their brief times of limited authority. They could only do so much and, truthfully, it would be understandable they could only recognize a part of the job that needed to be done.

I have to wonder if Margaret Thatcher chose that passage to be read. If so, then she is as much as telling us to not stop. Don’t sit down. Don’t relax. Now is not the time to rest from our labors; there are miles to go before we sleep—or before our children or grandchildren might get to do so.

Now more than ever we need to push forward on Margaret Thatcher’s campaign to privatize society and take it out of the hands of government regulators.

So stand. And pray.