Arizona College Suspends Nursing Student for Wanting Classes Taught in English, Not Spanish

I lived in Arizona for 36 years and still believe that it is God’s country.  But sadly, it is quickly becoming northern Mexico, just like California, New Mexico and Texas are.  Hispanics are still illegally flooding over the border and turning many family friendly communities into neighborhoods of drugs, crime and lowering property values.

The neighborhood I lived in before moving to northern Kentucky in 1996 was still a nicely cared for family friendly neighborhood.  The stores in the area reflected the neighborhoods around them.  It was a great place to raise a family and live.  Last summer, I went back to Arizona to visit my parents that live up in the White Mountains.  Before heading back to the airport in Phoenix, I took time to drive through the old neighborhood.  I was shocked and saddened by what I saw, but warned about it by family and friends.

Virtually the entire neighborhood had been overtaken by Hispanics, with some homes housing over 20 individuals.  The yards looked terrible and trashy.  The cars in the driveways looked the same.  I stopped into the local grocery store where we had always shopped and found that it had not only changed its name, but it had also changed the items it carried.  Most of the signs in the store were in Spanish along with many of the labels.  I felt more like I was in Mexico rather than in America.  I was looked down on and obviously watched and shunned by those in the store.  In fact, I was the only non-Hispanic in the store.

Terri Bennett experienced a similar situation this year, only it may have ruined her chances of pursuing the nursing degree she wanted.

Bennett enrolled in the nursing program at Pima Community College in Tucson.  She soon found herself assigned to a small student group of which she was the only one where English was their first language.  They were supposed to work together, but all of the others spoke Spanish, not English and Bennett had no clue what was going on.  The class was asked to fill out anonymous evaluation forms and on her form, she wrote that she would prefer that there would be no Spanish spoken in the classroom.

Shortly after filling out the evaluation, Bennett found herself in a classroom where Spanish was the predominate language, including the instructions and lessons.  She requested a meeting with David Kutzler, the Director of the Nursing Program to talk about how her learning environment was so challenging because of all of the Spanish spoken in the classroom.  According to Bennett, Kutzler accused her of discriminating against Mexican-Americans and referred to her a bigot and a bitch.

The very next day, Bennett was called into a meeting with other college staff.  She was again accused of being discriminating to the point that even if she stayed at PCC to complete her degree that she would never get a job afterwards.  During the meeting, Kutzler confronted her with her ‘anonymous’ evaluation.

Eleven days later, Bennett received a progress report that stated that she had ineffective communication skills.  A week later, Bennett was greeted by college security upon her arrival at the campus and told her that she needed to leave the campus immediately.  She received a letter stating that her:

“…presence on College property [posed] a significant risk of disruption of educational activities,” and that she “engaged in discriminatory conduct.”

According to a lawsuit that has been filed against the college:

“Then on Monday morning, April 22, 2013, Ms. Bennett arrived on campus. … She immediately noticed Mr. Kutzler running from his car into the Nursing Office building. She also noticed there were several law enforcement vehicles in the parking lot. … As Ms. Bennett entered the building, she was approached by a man who identified himself as head of PCC security, and who requested whether she was Terri Bennett and requested her to show her identity card, which Ms. Bennett did. … Ms. Bennett was given a sealed envelope, informed that she was immediately suspended from PCC, and instructed to leave campus immediately. … Upon information and belief, a police vehicle followed her to the freeway. Mr. Kutzler sent an email to PCC staff advising them that they were not allowed to talk to Ms. Bennett.”

Basically, Terri Bennett was expelled from Pima Community College for wanting to have her classes conducted in English, not Spanish.  Her lawsuit is based upon the school labeling her as a bigot, being discriminatory and for being indefinitely suspended from her studies.  In her lawsuit, they point out that Article 28 of the Arizona State Constitution established English as the official language of the state.  Section 3 of Article 28 states:

“A person shall not be discriminated against or penalized in any way because the person uses or attempts to use English in public or private.”

Her list of complaints against the school are:

1)    Violation of Art. 28, Arizona Constitution

2)    Violation of Right to Free Speech

3)    Unlawful Suspension

4)    Defamation

5)    Violation of Right to Privacy: False Light

6)    Discrimination

7)    Retaliation

8)    Harassment

9)    Breach of Contract

10) Breach of Duty of Good Faith and Fair Dealing

11) Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress

Since when is it discriminatory to want your college classes to be taught in English anywhere in the United States?  I hope that Terri Bennett not only wins her lawsuit, but that David Kutzler loses his job for being discriminatory against Bennett and for defaming her character.  A victory should also force the school to actually teach their courses in English and not Spanish.

This is America and our Founding Fathers selected English as the official language of our nation.  I have never seen anything that indicates this has been repealed.  Until that time, everything needs to be done in English and people coming to our nation need to make an effort to learn the language.  After all, if any of us move to another country, we are forced to learn the language, so should they.