Atheists Side With Hitler on Holocaust Memorial

The Freedom From Religion Foundation, one of the nation’s most prominent hate groups, has come out against featuring a Star of David at a planned Holocaust Memorial.

As usual, the FFRF is using its preferred tactic of claiming “separation of church and state” as a reason to exclude a religious symbol from the memorial planned for the Ohio capital.

“Permitting one permanent sectarian and exclusionary religious symbol … would create the legal precedent, for instance, to place an equally large or larger permanent Latin cross on Capitol grounds,” Don Barker and Annie Laurie Gaylor, FFRF co-presidents — and husband and wife — wrote in the letter.

The mention of a theoretical cross in their letter is significant because the FFRF hates Jews, but it REALLY hates Christians. The FFRF’s whole reason for existence seems, at least in recent years, to be to crush Jewish and Christian presence in public and to force non-atheist religions into a second-class citizenship where they can only be practiced in private.

You can’t help but wonder when the FFRF will start demanding the jizyah, a tax on unapproved religions.

The letter, available here, demands that any Holocaust memorial should be completely secular.

“The monument could resemble numerous powerful war memorials across the U.S. which do not use any sectarian images, including the national World War II Memorial, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Korean War Veterans Memorial. Each is secular in nature and without religious reference, which offends no one and is respected by all,” the letter says.

The clear difference between those other memorials and one intended to commemorate the Holocaust is that the Holocaust was directed primarily — not exclusively, but primarily — against one identifiable group, the Jews.

The FFRF’s letter then has the gall to pretend the organization is concerned about those other people targeted in the Holocaust, such as Catholic priests and Jehovah’s Witnesses, when what it wants is an echo of what Hitler wanted with the Holocaust: the erasure of the Jews from public memory.

The letter closes by saying that if Germany had separation of church and state, then the Holocaust wouldn’t have happened. More than a moment’s reflection, however, reveals that the Holocaust is EXACTLY what happens when you have the FFRF’s brand of church/state separation: the persecution of any religion that doesn’t fit in with the ruling creed.

Many of the Nazi leaders had pretensions of Christianity, but no matter what they called themselves, all of them abandoned the precepts of that religion and embraced an actual or implicit atheism that diminished the inherent value of human life and allowed them to follow a path paved by social Darwinism and the pseudoscience of eugenics. Nazism, like communism, must go down as an achievement of an atheist mindset taken to its inevitable conclusion.

It is despicable that the FFRF is given so much respect by the media and the Left, when there are mountains of evidence that it is little more than a hate group bent on institutionalizing government discrimination against non-atheists, and it manipulates the courts to rewrite history and erase religious contributions from public memory.

To eliminate the Star of David from a Holocaust memorial would be nothing more than a gross act of Holocaust revisionism on a par with the worst propaganda to come out of any Mideast Muslim dictatorship or Nazi training program.

Not only should Ohio go ahead with its planned memorial, with Star of David, but the FFRF should be investigated by the Department of Justice for its ongoing conspiracy to discriminate against other religions and bring about its dream of a state atheistic religion.