Surprise! Parties Blame Each Other for Super-committee Failure

When Congress was trying to resolve the deficit crisis this summer, both political parties agreed to form a super-committee to find a way to cut $1.2 trillion dollars off the US debt.  The committee was to be formed with three Republican senators, three Republican representatives, three Democratic senators and three Democratic representatives.  Those serving on the super-committee vowed to put partisan politics aside and work together for the good of the nation.

Several months later and with a deadline looming only two days away, there is no plan to cut the deficit.  It seems the only thing they have accomplished is to defeat every effort of cutting the deficit.  And there is only one reason they have not been able to succeed to full their appointed task and that reason is partisan politics.

Democrats insisted that certain taxes had to be increased and Republicans insisted that there would be no tax increases and that the deficit cuts had to be made by cutting spending.  It was all party politics and getting their way over the other.

Now they stand before the American public and point their fingers at each other and like school kids hollering it’s the other’s fault, not their own.

But did any of us really expect them to accomplish anything from the onset?  At the time of the committee formation, the two Parties were unwilling to budge or work with the other.  Since then, the partisan chasm has continued to widen further and further apart.

I only see one possible solution to solving the rift between the two Parties and that’s to outlaw the Democratic Party on the grounds of being anti-American terrorists and replace them all with Republicans and Independents.  After all, they are the only Parties that have any indication of wanting to be fiscally responsible by reducing the size of the government and slashing government spending while at the same time leaving as much money in the hands of the people as possible which is the only way to spur the economy.