Black Pastors Say President Obama’s ‘Gay Marriage’ Announcement Will Cost Him Black Votes

Hallelujah!  President Barack Obama’s endorsement of ‘gay marriage’ is starting to have, what I would call, positive effects.

A number of black pastors have come out against Obama’s announcement and say that they are hearing from their black parishioners that they will not vote for Obama in November because it.

Council Nedd II is the Bishop of the Episcopal Missionary Church and is also a commentator of religious, cultural and political issues.  He is also involved with Project 21.  According to their website,

“Project 21 is an initiative of The National Center for Public Policy Research to promote the views of African-Americans whose entrepreneurial spirit, dedication to family and commitment to individual responsibility has not traditionally been echoed by the nation’s civil rights establishment.”

In an interview with OneNewsNow, Nedd commented about Obama’s endorsement of homosexual marriage by saying,

“[The president] reversed his position seemingly for a short-term money grab from the gay community.  The other issue is scriptural — scripture is clear from Genesis to Revelation: marriage is defined as a holy covenant blessed by God between a man and a woman. And the issue is that simple with me.”

“The people who I have personally spoken to are clearly opposed to gay marriage, clearly opposed to President Obama pandering to the gay community in this way.  But I also know there are a lot of people who are surprisingly — or maybe not so surprisingly — supporting the president on this issue, and the question I ask is: Why? They’re going to have to be accountable for their actions at some point.”

“American society right now has this view of this happened to them, but we’re not going to let that happen to us — and it’s foolish.”

Coalition of African-American Pastors president and founder William Owens Sr said that he was appalled by President Obama’s announcement and is also upset that homosexual activists are trying to equate their agenda with the black civil rights movement.  He also said that a number of blacks that he knows say they will not vote for Obama in November because of his support of same-sex marriages.  Owens said,

“We are really tired of the homosexual community hijacking the civil rights movement.  I did not choose to be black and you did not choose to be white — and homosexuals make a choice to be homosexual. So why compare what we went through with your situation? It’s not the same thing; there’s no comparison.”

Owens also said that the President may be surprised at how many black voters will not vote for him in November because they are adamantly against homosexual marriages.  He told OneNewsNow,

“We did a little survey ourselves by just telephone calls to people we knew.  And there was a solid 13 percent who said they absolutely would not vote for President Obama again because of his stand on homosexual marriages.”

Owens said that CAAP has started a petition drive with which they hope to gather over 100,000 signatures from black voters telling Obama that they do not support his same-sex marriage views.

Exit polls taken during the 2008 election indicated that nearly 95% of blacks voted for Obama.  Losing even 13% of black voters could make a huge difference in the November general election, and this only one week after his announcement.  As more pastors, (black, white, Hispanic, Asian, etc) speak to their congregations, I’m sure the number of people who will refuse to vote for him will only increase, and rightfully so.