Black Woman Says Black People Should “Speak Properly”


As difficult as blacks had it during the days of segregation, a distinctly black culture developed, even in the prevalence of racist attitudes and restrictive laws. We forget, or have never been told, that Washington, D.C., from 1920 to 1960, “was a financial, spiritual, and cultural stronghold. Because Washington was a segregated city, blacks simply created their own metropolis. . . . The first black bank, the Industrial Savings Bank, was started here.” While “the black population of New York’s Harlem inherited many of its buildings from previous white owners, . . . many of the buildings in Shaw were paid for by black businessmen and built by black hands.”1

Families were intact, the divorce and unwed mother rates were no different from that of white communities.

Take a look at photographs of the 1963 March on Washington led by Martin Luther King, Jr. Notice how everyone is dressed. Most of the men are wearing suits and ties. Many of the women are wearing hats, as are the men. There is a dignity about the crowd.

Blacks are not helped by the continued claim that all problems for them are racial. Some are, but most aren’t. Black-on-black crime is not the fault of white people. Sky-high out-of-wedlock births are not the fault of whites. High dropout rates among blacks are not the fault of whites. The solution is not to cry “racism” and blame everything on whites or hundreds of years of oppression. Blacks won’t find their problems solved by appealing to the State.

Welfare programs have done a lot to keep black families down by subsidizing family fragmentation and fostering multi-generational dependency. Black problems aren’t solved by naming streets after Martin Luther King, Jr. The same can be said for the King Holiday and Black History Month. These are liberal crumbs to appease the black community, but have any of these actions helped blacks?

Consider this recollection by basketball great Kareem Abdul-Jabbar when as a 9-year-old he was enrolled in a predominately black Catholic school outside of Philadelphia in the 1950s:

“I got there and immediately found I could read better than anyone in the school. My father’s example and my mother’s training had made that come easy. I could pick up a book, read it out loud, pronounce the words with proper inflection and actually know what they meant. When the nuns found this out they paid me a lot of attention, once even asking me, a fourth grader, to read to the seventh grade. When the kids found this out I became a target…

“It was my first time away from home, my first experience in an all-black situation, and I found myself being punished for doing everything I’d ever been taught was right. I got all A’s and was hated for it; I spoke correctly and was called a punk. I had to learn a new language simply to be able to deal with the threats. I had good manners and was a good little boy and paid for it with my hide.”

The following is from The Conservative Tribune.

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Sadly, many black people in America today blame the problems they face on institutionalized racism from white people.

In reality, much of the issues they face stem from years of liberal policies implemented by Democrats.

These policies have led to absurd levels of black on black crime, namely because of the destruction of the black family, the embracing of poverty and the welfare state, and an abysmal public education system.

This lack of a good education has resulted in many black people not having a solid grasp of the English language.  Not being able to speak properly and clearly only perpetuates the unemployment and poverty issues that plague many black Americans.

One young black lady wants to change all of that, and she put out a video explaining why it is important for black people to learn to “speak properly”. (H/T Top Right News)

Go here to read the rest of the article

  1. Mark Cauvreau Judge, If It Ain’t Got that Swing: The Rebirth of Grown-Up Culture (Dallas, TX: Spence Publishing Company, 2000), 4. []
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