Brits Shocked Americans Think Obama’s the Antichrist

Public Policy Polling, an opinion research firm whose client list is packed with liberal media outlets, isn’t exactly one of the go-to organizations for unbiased research. Still, they make a show of trying to be neutral most of the time.

Which makes a recent poll they conducted all the more amusing. The PPP bosses obviously decided to cut loose in an effort to associate conservative voters with “the fringe,” that allegedly wacko gray zone populated by aliens and bigfoots (bigfeet?) where government is run by powerful, secretive groups and people dare to question mainstream science.

The headline finding of the survey is that one in four Americans think President Obama “may be” the Antichrist.

My initial reaction was that the number seemed low, but the British Guardian was horrified. According to the Guardian, the poll was designed to give respondents every opportunity to appear sane, “phrasing the questions in eye-catching language that will have the country’s educators banging their heads on their desks.”

The actual numbers PPP came up with were 13 percent of Americans believe Obama is the Antichrist, and another 13 percent were unsure but remained open to the possibility. I think I’d be in that 13 percent, just for laughs. I figure Obama’s too much of a bumbling amateur to really be the Antichrist, though he’s certainly an antichrist because of his Administration’s assaults on religious liberty via the Obamacare mandate, support for infanticide and the push for gay “marriage.” It’s really a matter of theological interpretation.

Another result that had the Guardian’s jaw on the floor was that “more than a third” of Americans believe global warming is a hoax. Gasp. Actually, it was 37 percent who outright believe global warming is a fraud, and 12 percent who were unsure, so 49 percent of us aren’t buying into the climate change “crisis.” I call that progress. The Guardian, natch, praised the gullible 51 percent who accept “the overwhelming majority view of the scientific establishment” that we’re all going to die from global warming. Just the fact that the Guardian can write that phrase shows how little journalists understand science and how little they’ve actually investigated claims of the climate change crowd. The fact that Al Gore bought an oceanfront villa in Montecito should tell you everything you need to know about global warming claims.

The other “alarming” finding that had the Guardian’s editors quaking in their loafers is that 28 percent of Americans know — pardon me, “believe” in the poll’s language — that there is a “sinister global New World Order conspiracy, aimed at ruling the whole world through authoritarian government.” An additional 25 percent were not sure, so only 46 percent of Americans can’t smell the rat that’s right in front of them. I’m not sure how to put this in a way that won’t hurt the feelings of that 46 percent, which obviously has the Guardian’s and PPP’s sympathy, so I won’t bother being so gentle. The sinister conspiracy has websites. You can Google them and read what they’re up to in their own words. The Council on Foreign Relations, Agenda 21, the Economic Consultative Committee, the Tides Foundation, the United Religions Initiative — I would advise any so-called journalists who have survived thus far the information apocalypse to start by Googling those names and following the money. Really, anyone insisting that there is no international effort to create a one-world government is just embarrassingly ignorant at this point.

Other “insane theories,” as the Guardian says, that Americans believe in are: the moon landing was faked (7 percent), bigfoot (14 percent), shape shifting reptilians who secretly run the planet (4 percent), the U.S. government allowed 9-11 (11 percent), and Paul McCartney was killed in 1966 and replaced with a double (5 percent).

Personally, I’m not sure about bigfoot existing, but I’m rooting for him. As far as shape-shifting reptilian aliens, you might want to take a look at some of the weird people in Obama’s Secret Service entourage before you make up your mind (try YouTube). I’m skeptical about Paul McCartney’s replacement, but if the question had been about Michael Jackson being replaced by an alien after the release of Thriller, PPP might have gotten close to 100 percent.

The grand conclusion of PPP and the Guardian, though, is that all those benighted fools who believe crazy conspiracy theories are mostly Republicans, with Democrats being the clear-headed thinkers. According to the Guardian:

“The survey was carried out in order to explore how voters’ political beliefs impact on their willingness to embrace conspiracy theories — it did indeed find that the partisan divide that is blamed for many problems in Washington DC also extends to the world of paranoia, aliens and Sasquatch. For example, when it comes to thinking global warming is a hoax some 58% of Republicans agreed and 77% of Democrats disagreed. While 20% of Republicans believed Obama is the antichrist heralding the end times, only 13% of independents did and just 6% of Democrats.”

What the Guardian and PPP dismiss as just “conspiracy theories,” though, are usually the results of someone investigating to the best of their ability certain facts that don’t add up. While the conclusions may be questionable, like in the case of faking the moon landings, what PPP’s poll tells me is that it’s the people on the Left who don’t like to ask questions, preferring to be led by the nose by authority figures, be they politicians, scientists or journalists.

Much of history has been influenced by what in their day would have been considered conspiracies, from the writing of the Declaration of Independence to the Manhattan Project to MK-Ultra. That “black helicopter crowd” that the Bidens and Obamas of the world fear so much is using its brains to reach conclusions that aren’t sanctioned by the Powers That Be.

That’s why the Left has to make an effort to label and ridicule conservatives, because the facts are rarely on the Left’s side.