Colleges Offer Insurance for Gender Change Operations

When most people think about healthcare, they usually have broken bones, infections, cancer, severe cuts and lacerations, and needed operations to fix any number health debilitating ailments in mind. Health insurance was never intended to cover every ailment under the sun, and it certainly wasn’t designed to cover sex-change operations.

One of the reasons insurance premiums have continued to rise is due to the bloated call for covering any and all ailments, many of which are self-induced (e.g., smoking, alcoholism, obesity).

Leave it to our nation’s whacked out, leftist colleges to lead the way in paying for sex-change operations. Brown University’s Student Health Insurance Plan “will cover 14 different sexual reassignment surgery procedures for students starting August [2013], reports the Brown Daily Herald student newspaper.”

Unbeknownst to me, Brown isn’t the first university “to offer real change to the student body,” as William A. Jacobson, Associate Clinical Professor of Law and Director of the Securities Law Clinic at Cornell Law School, aptly put it.

Cornell, Harvard, Stanford, and the University of Pennsylvania also included gender reassignment surgery as part of the schools’ insurance policies, according to the Human Rights Campaign.

“For female-to-male surgeries, the new coverage plan will include mastectomy, hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy, vaginectomy, metoidioplasty, scrotoplasty, urethroplasty, placement of testicular prostheses (and) phalioplasty,” the Daily Herald reports. “For male-to-female surgeries, coverage will include orchiectomy, penectomy, vaginoplasty, clitoroplasty (and) labiaplasty.”

The cost? “In general, the total package of sexual reassignment surgeries, hormone therapy and other services can cost up to $50,000.”

Welcome to the brave new world of healthcare where “equality” is the name of the game. Everybody has to be treated equally. If a man wants to be a woman or a woman a man, equality demands that something be done about it.

There is logic in the nonsense. Christian philosopher Cornelius Van Til called this type of thinking “integration downward into the void.” The goal is to overturn all taboos. It begins simply with changing attitudes about sexuality, dress, language, the acceptance of pornography as art, promiscuity, co-habitation outside of marriage, out of wedlock births, abortion on demand, homosexual “tolerance,” homosexuality as normal sexual behavior, and homosexual marriage legitimized by the State, none of which garner much public moral disapproval these days.

The embodiment of the new ethic can be found in the life and writings of Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892–1950). Millay was an American lyrical poet, playwright, and radical feminist. She received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1923.

She used her notoriety to break down cultural mores related to sex and sexuality that have made their way into the American psyche:

“Millay moved to Greenwich Village, a community of free spirits — women and men such as John Reed, who boasted: ‘We are free who live in Washington Square. We dare to think as Uptown wouldn’t dare.’ Much of that idea of living free was about sexual liberation. Millay cultivated freedom of speech in a way that Madison and Jefferson could  never have imagined. When her sister came to stay, Edna made her practice speaking obscenities while they sat darning stockings together, chanting softly, ‘Needle in, S**t. Needle out, P*ss. Needle in, F**k. Needle out, c**t. Until we were easy with the words.’

“She had as series of love affairs with women and men and plunged headlong into what she called the ‘whirlpool of eros.’ The first affair appears to have been in 1912, with a woman in Maine. In ten years, there would be more than one hundred affairs, sometimes five or six at once.” ((David Hackett Fischer, Liberty and Freedom: A Visual History of America’s Founding Ideas (Mew York: Oxford University Press, 2005), 472-473. Also see Nancy Milford, Savage Beauty: The Life of Edna St. Vincent Millay (New York, 2001).

It’s taken time, but our nation has gotten “easy with” sexual perversion, so much so that now we are insuring it.