Conceal and Carry Passes House, Senate Next

Ever since Democratic Representative Gabrielle Giffords from Arizona was shot in the head in January, there has not been any piece of legislation dealing with guns introduced into the House of Representatives.  Although the United Nations continued to push absolute gun control via their Small Arms Treaty, neither branch of Congress has entertained a firearms measure until now.

The measure that went to floor of the House dealt with the issue of a person with a concealed carry weapons permit traveling from one state to another.  Currently, when a person with a permit to carry a concealed weapon in one state travels to another state that has different laws, that person can be arrested in the second state.  The new bill would require every state to recognize the conceal permit from the home state of the person with the permit, similar to the way they recognize driver’s licenses from other states.

Currently, thirty-five states have a ‘shall issue’ conceal and carry permit, ten have a ‘may issue’ permit and five states do not require a permit to carry a concealed weapon.  However, the laws and requirements for carrying a concealed weapon varies from state to state and this has been the issue which spurred the current piece of legislation.

On Wednesday, the Republican sponsored bill went to the floor of the House for a vote.  With so many democrats advocating stricter gun control, I admit that I am surprised to see that the vote was 272 in favor of the measure and 154 voting against it.  Even more surprising is the fact that forty-three Democrats voted in favor of the measure.

Now the House bill moves on to the Democratic controlled Senate.  Considering recent history of how the Democratic controlled Senate has repeatedly refused to even consider any House Republican bills that came their way, there is no telling what will happen with the Senate.