Despite National Impoverishment, Politicians Facing Pushback On Big Brother

It seems that politicians are facing so much opposition on the NSA’s unconstitutional spying on American citizens that Politico.com had to write about it. While they assure the reader that no one is as angry as they were about Obamacare (nice to be reminded of that, though) it is still undeniable:

“Still, doubts and criticisms about government snooping have started to surface in numerous districts and states, a reflection that Edward Snowden’s leaks are kindling public suspicions. Amid the mounting revelations, some voters seem eager to have a debate that President Barack Obama and most of Washington never wanted in the first place. A Washington Post report Thursday that the NSA broke privacy rules thousands of times a year may only add to the questions lawmakers face.”

This is important because, with Justin Amash’s amendment three weeks ago, Congress came very close to defunding the NSA spy program that they knew about. Even that vote was based on government lies since it looks likely that Rep. Mike Rogers gave Congress false assurances about what the NSA was doing. They didn’t learn about XKeyscore until later. If people are so concerned that these representatives are hearing their concerns, it is possible that we might see a real roll back forced on the NSA.

The article is filled with accounts of one politician after another facing protests and questions about the NSA. Some statements are particularly revealing. For example:

“It’s even touched Fitzpatrick’s home base, the economically stratified 8th District of Pennsylvania. Unemployment reached about 7 percent in Bucks County this summer, and jobs and health care still trump all else. But at a town hall in Lower Salford last weekend and a telephone town hall this summer, Fitzpatrick said he found himself diverting from those key issues briefly to answer at least a few NSA questions. ‘There are many issues the American people are concerned about, privacy chief among them. And while it may not come up at every town hall, it is, I believe, based on conversations with my constituents, always on their minds,’ Fitzpatrick told POLITICO last week, just after speaking at a local Lower Bucks County Chamber of Commerce event dominated not by surveillance but by spending, transportation and health care.”

From this and other statements, it seems as if Politico thinks we should be surprised that people have time to waste on concerns about government spying when we are dealing with a bad economy. Which makes me wonder, is a bad economy an asset to a government that wants to expand their powers? Just as Rahm Emanuel said that one must never let an emergency go to waste, is national impoverishment supposed to provide a distraction so that politicians can get away with new security expansions?

I am not sure how to prove whether or not anyone in government thinks that way, but it is worth considering.