The Election Win And Loss For The Secession Of North Colorado

Going into last Tuesday’s election, the question of forming North Colorado by secession appeared on the ballots in 10 northeastern and 1 northwestern Colorado counties.  Their quest for secession was prompted by the liberal state legislature and governor that were responsible for the passage of a number of strict gun and green energy laws.  Groups in each of the counties pushed to pursue secession in order to form the 51st state, one that would be governed by the conservative values they feel have been lost.

Article 2 of the Colorado state constitution says:

“The people of this state have the sole and exclusive right of governing themselves, as a free, sovereign and independent state; and to alter and abolish their constitution and form of government whenever they may deem it necessary to their safety and happiness, provided, such change be not repugnant to the Constitution of the United States.”

When all of the votes were counted, the measure to pursue secession passed in only 5 of the 11 counties.  Those passing the measure were Cheyenne, Kit Carson, Philips, Washington and Yuma counties.  They are contiguous to each other making the geographical possibility of forming a new state better than if the states had been separated by counties voting the measure down.

The counties that voted against the secession measure were Elbert, Lincoln, Logan, Moffat, Sedgwick and Weld.  But in some of these counties, the measure didn’t fail by much.  Leader of the secession movement, Jeffery Hare commented on the results, saying:

“This is an important moment for liberty.  We have five counties in this state that have said they want to exercise their rights under the state constitution and secede.”

“Since this movement began a few months ago we went from zero to 43 percent approval even in the counties that voted against the issue.  This is especially significant when you consider that unlike other ballot initiatives, there was no organized campaign in support of the measure.”

“The most we did was a few radio ads and Facebook posts. We didn’t have the time or money to have meetings advocating the issue. In spite of this, large percentages of voters said they wanted to leave the state.”

“We now need to focus on educating people in the counties that voted for the issue on the need to put pressure on the legislature to allow them to have an actual vote on the issue.  These counties are all right next to each other, we have established a beachhead for secession in the state and we need to build on the ground we do have.”

In order to succeed, they need to get the state legislature to vote in favor of the secession and then it must go to Congress to be voted on.  Many say that it is a longshot that North Colorado becomes the 51st state.  The last state to form by seceding from another state was West Virginia in 1863.  Many have tried since, but none have succeeded.  Will North Colorado be the first new state to form by secession in 150 years?  Chances are slim, but anything is possible.