Florida County Makes Atheists Cry


If you’ve followed the many hundreds of lawsuits filed by atheist groups such as the Freedom From Religion Foundation, you may have noticed that atheists want to have their cake and eat it too.

By claiming to be a “non-religion” (after all, they don’t believe in anything), they pose as being self-fulfilled sophisticates above the petty religious frays of others. Yet let some inspired Christian display a cross, the Ten Commandments or a Bible, or — Flying Spaghetti Monster forbid — pray in public, then all of a sudden their formerly dead religious sensibilities rise from the grave and demand blood.

In other words, they want all the perks of religious respectability with none of the responsibilities. They are the godless inquisitors who feel that they alone are qualified to judge all other religions.

It’s been a profitable game as courts have often gone along with the atheists’ unreligiously inspired crusade to crush the infidels — particularly Christians — and drive them from the public eye, leaving the landscape empty of all — except the atheists who will dictate allowable religious observance for everyone else.

So it’s more than a little gratifying to see the Brevard County Commission in Florida vote unanimously to bar atheists from giving the opening invocation at commission meetings because the invocation is defined as “an opening prayer, presented by members of our faith community.”

Now it’s important to note that the commissioners didn’t ban atheists from participating in meetings, offering them time in the public comments portion of the agenda, right alongside any other non-faith organization, be it Shriners, Girl Scouts or some guy complaining about his neighbor’s cherry tree. Local atheists are not pleased.

atheistsIn a letter to David Williamson, founder of the Central Florida Freethought Community, the ultimate instigators of this kerfuffle, the commission wrote, “The prayer is delivered during the ceremonial portion of the county’s meeting, and typically invokes guidance for the County Commission from the highest spiritual authority, a higher authority which a substantial body of Brevard constituents believe to exist. The invocation is also meant to lend gravity to the occasion, to reflect values long part of the county’s heritage, and to acknowledge the place religion holds in the lives of many private citizens in Brevard County.”

In other words, “non-religions” need not apply.

Atheists naturally are irate.

Resident Joseph Richardson noted at the commission meeting where the decision was made, that any government activity that excludes “atheists, humanists, or any segment of your population, no matter how small, from full participation in government activities — if any government activity requires such an exclusion, then that activity is patently unfair, unequal, unconstitutional, and should no longer be a part of the government.”

Any segment of the population? Full participation? You mean like when courts, at atheists’ insistence. ban Christians from publicly praying or demonstrating their participation in and support of government by displaying symbols of their faith? No? Because it sure sounds like atheists want to be able to fully participate by demonstrating and practicing their beliefs in public during government functions.

OH, WAIT. Atheism is a “non-religion,” isn’t it? You don’t have any religious beliefs, right? So really you aren’t being excluded from anything.

Huh.

Actually, I would be more sensitive to the atheist argument if there weren’t such a really, truly simple solution: Admit that atheism is a religion like any other, then they have to let you participate in the invocation.

But that won’t likely happen, as it would require a level of personal insight and honesty that is lacking in the atheist movement.

Atheists, that explosive pain in your gut? That is your own petard. Consider yourselves hoisted.

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