Freedom From Religion Foundation Little More Than a Hate Group

In the tradition of such liberal organizations as the New Black Panther Party, the KKK and Occupy Wall Street, the Freedom From Religion Foundation makes its living and builds its reputation by publicly bullying a group that it blames for all the evils in society.

The FFRF, founded by atheists Anne Nicol Gaylor and her daughter, Annie Laurie Gaylor, in 1976, is the major organization whose name crops up whenever someone is “offended” by a public display of the Ten Commandments, a graduation prayer or a Christmas display.

They’ve gone after historical markers, courthouse displays and even veterans memorials. There’s no corner of America’s Judeo-Christian heritage that FFRF isn’t low enough to seek to obliterate.

One of their latest targets is a large stone monument with the Ten Commandments erected in 1957 outside Connellsville Junior High School in Pennsylvania. The monument was donated by the Fraternal Order of Eagles.

According to the FFRF, the monument somehow violates the First Amendment. The suit was filed on behalf of a child and parent who said the monument makes them feel excluded, according to the complaint. They also don’t want the monument moved to a nearby church because it would still be in view of the school.

The First Amendment states, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.”

Oddly enough, there’s nothing in there about school districts not being allowed to display a historic monument donated by local community faith groups just because someone doesn’t like the words on it.

But this is the state that liberal courts and hate groups like the FFRF have brought us to. The First Amendment was meant to protect religious speech, not excise it from public life.

What’s really been going on with the FFRF and the courts getting rid of public religion is the establishment of a state religion called secular humanism, atheism, communism or any of several other names, all of which promote the worship of the self.

The current fad is to pretend that atheism is not a religion, but it is. In the 1950s, humanist organization sought tax exemptions as religious organizations. Julian Huxley called it “religion without revelation.”

In fact the current dodge about atheism not being religion is designed so that Christians can’t do to atheism exactly what the atheists are doing to Christianity — kicking it out of the schools and public life.