Friday’s Storms Demonstrate How Vulnerable U.S. is

Last Friday, a rare weather event known as a super derecho literally blew across some of the most populated areas of the United States.  A derecho is a strong wind that precedes a fast moving thunderstorm.  In cases when the winds are very strong and accompanying storms are widespread and travel for miles, they are referred to as a super derecho.

In the case of last Friday’s super derecho, the storm formed over northern Indiana and then traveled over 700 miles across Ohio, northern Kentucky, West Virginia, Maryland, Virginia and Washington D.C. in only 12 hours time.  Wind gusts in some areas reached 90 miles per hour, equivalent to hurricane force winds, knocking the power out to over 3 million Americans.

Some of those without power may not get theirs back on until this coming weekend.  My brother in Virginia is one of those that may go an entire week without power.  Fortunately, he has a generator with which to power his refrigerator and freezer and lights at night, but not enough to run his air conditioning.  However, most people do not have generators and will end up losing hundreds of dollars’ worth of food.

As I was reading about the outages and some of the comments, I couldn’t help but wonder what would happen if the country was hit with a large enough EMP (electromagnetic pulse) burst.  If a large enough EMP burst occurred over a major city such as Washington D.C. or New York, it would disable almost every electronic device in the area.  Computers and power grids would go down and probably stay down for weeks to months until they could be repaired or replaced.

According to Alex Jones’ Inforwars, a massive solar storm or nuclear explosion high in the atmosphere, would result in an EMP burst sufficient enough that could shut down large sections of the United States and possibly the entire country.

The results would be catastrophic.  It would not only shut down electricity, but it would destroy all air travel, banking, commerce, financial and defense systems.  Virtually all travel would be brought to a halt as no one could pump gasoline for their cars or diesel for trucking.  No one could use their cell phones, iPods or any other form of communication.

Such an EMP burst would not only just shut down all electronic devices; it would also destroy most electronically stored records and data.  Once systems were repaired or replaced, it would take years of sorting through paper records to restore some of the data, while many records and data would be lost forever.  Basically, the country would be thrown back a hundred years or more and we would be left vulnerable to a number of different attacks.

If you don’t believe me, just keep watching the news about last Friday’s storm and the impact it had.  That’s only a small peek of what just might be someday.