Gestapo-Like Initiative Becomes Law in San Antonio

The latest act of political tyranny comes out of San Antonio, Texas. Here’s the story (see Texas constitutional provisions that follow that are specifically violated by the new law):

“The San Antonio City Council passed by an 8-3 vote a controversial ordinance Thursday (Sept. 5) by which city officials can be removed from office and businesses made liable if they demonstrate ‘a bias in word or deed’ on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity.”

So how does this new law square with provisions found in the Texas Constitution? It is a clear violation of several sections. It remains to be seen if the new law will be challenged and how the State Supreme Court will rule. If New Mexico is any indication, it does not look good:

THE TEXAS CONSTITUTION

ARTICLE 1. BILL OF RIGHTS

Section 3: “EQUAL RIGHTS. All free men, when they form a social compact, have equal rights, and no man, or set of men, is entitled to exclusive separate public emoluments, or privileges, but in consideration of public services.”

Section 8: “FREEDOM OF SPEECH AND PRESS; LIBEL. Every person shall be at liberty to speak, write or publish his opinions on any subject, being responsible for the abuse of that privilege; and no law shall ever be passed curtailing the liberty of speech or of the press. In prosecutions for the publication of papers, investigating the conduct of officers, or men in public capacity, or when the matter published is proper for public information, the truth thereof may be given in evidence. And in all indictments for libels, the jury shall have the right to determine the law and the facts, under the direction of the court, as in other cases.”

Section 3a: “EQUALITY UNDER THE LAW. Equality under the law shall not be denied or abridged because of sex, race, color, creed, or national origin. This amendment is self-operative.” (“Creed” refers to religious beliefs.)

Section 4: RELIGIOUS TESTS. No religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office, or public trust, in this State; nor shall any one be excluded from holding office on account of his religious sentiments, provided he acknowledge the existence of a Supreme Being.”

The freedoms outlined in the Texas state constitution goes much further than our national constitution it protecting people in their beliefs.