Gun Control Comes to Major League Baseball

Just when you thought the reaches of anti-gun fanatics had already invaded every realm possible, you learn that there’s one more for them to spread their personal views.

When the Houston Astros first entered Major League Baseball, they were known as the Houston Colt .45s.  The team symbol portrayed a Colt .45 pistol which was meant to pay tribute to the gun that won the west.

The Astros announced plans to honor the original team name twice this season by wearing the old jerseys and hats.  However, Major League Baseball’s home office, which just so happens to be located in one of the most anti-gun cities in the nation, New York City would not approve the old logo to be used on the jerseys and promotional material unless the gun was removed from it.

When an Astros fan wrote to a letter to Bob Selig, MLB Commissioner, he received a letter from the Astros organization with the following,

“During our discussion with Major League Baseball, it was expressed to us that we could wear the uniform as long as the pistol was removed. We realize this changes the original design, but we still want to honor the Colt .45s. We are also under an obligation to follow Major League Baseball’s requests.”

I can’t blame Astros fans for being upset.  After all, they allow the Atlanta Braves to display a tomahawk and they allow Pittsburg to use a pirate which depicts an illegal and dangerous practice that still troubles some areas of the world.  And let’s not forget the Milwaukee Brewers which technically is about the brewing and consumption of alcoholic beverages.

The decision by MLB can only be interpreted as someone’s personal anti-gun agenda being forced on a team that wants to commemorate its 50th anniversary by honoring its original namesake.  I’m not an Astros’ fan, but if I were, I would pursue this further to find out exactly who was responsible for making this decision.  Then I would demand they recant or resign.

A public sport like professional baseball is no place for someone in authority to express their personal views, especially on something so harmless as a historic emblem on a jersey.  Every Houston fan needs to get jerseys and t-shirts with the old emblem complete with the pistol and wear them to those two games and at the seventh inning stretch, they need to let their disdain for MLB officials heard loud and clear.