Illegal Alien Students Are Still Illegal

This past Friday an article was posted online from the Marietta Daily Journal titled, “Immigrant Students Seek Georgia’s In-State Tuition.

Right off the bat we see the apparent bias that is rampant throughout virtually all media. Did you notice the articles title is missing a very important component – the word illegal? This is all too typical – and frankly I’m not sure if it’s bias or just lazy reporting, or both.

I recently wrote that promotion leads to tolerance, tolerance leads to acceptance and acceptance leads to equality. Lazy reporting and advocacy has led to illegal immigration equaling immigration. There seems to be no more distinction. Okay, back to the article.

The Journal article pertains to a lawsuit that “roughly 3 dozen immigrants” filed in Georgia state court, asking a judge to grant them in-state tuition.

These young “immigrants” are children of illegal aliens. So therefore, they themselves are also in the U.S. illegally.

Does that not raise a red flag and pose a most obvious question? The obvious question should be asked of the Judge is: “Judge, these ‘young immigrants’ are here illegally, meaning that they are not supposed to be here. Why then, Dekalb County Superior Court Judge Mark Anthony Scott, have you agreed to hear this case?”

The Journal attempts to answer the question by citing Obama’s executive order, known as the “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals” which allows young illegals protection from deportation.

But as we all know (or should), this Executive Order is not law because Congress never passed it. Last time I checked, judges are supposed to rule on and uphold the law, which this is not.

The article continues by explaining that, “The Georgia University system requires any student seeking in-state status for tuition purposes to provide verification of ‘lawful presence’ in the U.S.”

The lawsuit claims that University Regents policy does not define “lawful presence.”

Oh really. I guess Chuck Kuck, attorney for the young criminal aliens, didn’t look very hard because I found it and I’m just a schlub, not an attorney.

Allow me to do attorney Kuck’s research for him and quote the Georgia University system manual: “Each University system institution shall verify the lawful presence in the United States of every successfully admitted person applying for resident tuition status. There are several methods through which institutions may verify the lawful presence of their students:

  • A US certificate of naturalization (USCIS form-550 or N-570)
  • A US certificate of citizenship (USCIS form N-560 or N-561)
  • A current US passport with an expiration date after the first day of your initial term (photocopy must include the photo page and the following page)
  • A current drivers license issued by the state of Georgia after January 1, 2008 (temporary paper licenses and licenses marked “limited term” are invalid for verification purposes)
  • A current state issued ID issued by the state of Georgia after January 1, 2008
  • Permanent Resident Card (USCIS form I-151 or I-551)
  • Military ID presented in person (service members only, not valid for dependents. Scans, faxes, or photocopies will not be accepted)

As I said, I’m not a highly edumicated attorney, but that seems awfully clear to me.

But sadly I fear, these young “immigrants” will have their day in court and if they win that will then be the dreaded “precedent” for hundreds more suits to follow.

I can’t blame these kids for trying this. I do blame the courts and this judge for entertaining it.