Jobs Plans – Debt Crisis Part 2

With all the debating taking place in Washington and on the campaign trail concerning jobs, the only thing that seems clear is that little will be accomplished soon.  Even though both Democrats and Republicans are calling for bipartisanship, neither side seems willing to work together for the good of the nation.

Besides the President’s jobs plan, Romney, Huntsman, Gingrich, Boehner and Cantor have all put forth job plans of their own.  Some want more spending, others want more tax breaks, some want tax breaks to be temporary, others permanent, some want more spending on energy and others want more spending on construction and so on.

From this vantage point, the jobs debate is looking eerily similar to the debates that took place earlier this summer on the debt crisis.  I’m surprised that no one has taken up the Hollywood tradition of sequels and labeled the jobs debates as ‘Debt Crisis Part 2.’

And it is precisely because of this that many employers are saying that they are not hiring.  The inability of Washington to effectively handle any major issue at this time has caused a state of uncertainty with employers.  If tax breaks are only going to be temporary, they don’t want to hire.  If the economy is not going to recover soon, they don’t want to hire.  If taxes on the wealthy who own many businesses are going to increase, they don’t want to hire.  If all of the hidden taxes in Obamacare are not repealed, they don’t want to hire.  If they can’t have any confidence in Washington, they don’t want to hire.

The bottom line is that as long as this is business as usual on Capitol Hill, businesses are reticent to hire. Like the computer industry, it’s not the programs that are the problem, it’s the programmers.

Therefore, I seriously doubt if anything comes out of Washington at this time that will actually help create the 1 million jobs everyone is looking for.