Join the Military and Increase Your Chance Of Sexual Assault

The first thing I want to say is that I support and honor our service men and women and know that there are many who conduct themselves properly and proudly.  To them I salute and want them to know that I am not aiming this article at them.

However, current reports indicate that growing number of service men and women are finding themselves the victims of sexual assaults from fellow members of the military.  According to the Center for Military Readiness, an organization that serves as a military watchdog, the incidents of reported sexual assaults have increased by 22% since 2007 and violent sex crimes among members of the US Army have almost doubled since 2006.  The overall trend indicates that sex related crimes in the US military are increasing by 15% each year.

And before you start in about it referring to just the women serving in the military, think again.  Elaine Donnelly, president of CMR says,

“We also know that contrary to premature claims about successful repeal of the 1993 law regarding homosexual conduct, male sexual assault victims also have increased significantly.”

I warned about the problems of repealing the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy and now we are seeing some of those warnings coming to fruition.  I said it then and I’ll say it again.  I would not be comfortable serving in close quarters with a gay man.  I’m not a homophobe, rather I detest the sinful lifestyle that the Bible describes as an abomination.  I’d feel that same way serving next to a murderer, rapist or pedophile.

The openness of America’s sexual morals is also having a profound effect on US military personnel and is partially responsible for the increase in unacceptable conduct among those that serve.  For instance, Donnelly points out,

“The Navy has had to fire ship captains, executive officers [and] senior enlisted officers at rates approaching two per month for the last two years, most often for reasons of sexual misconduct.”

She also expresses her frustration with the Pentagon who seem to be impotent when it comes to handling these situations or trying to do anything to curb the rising trend.  Donnelly explains,

“There is no effective strategy for reversing this trend.”

“The Pentagon, all they do is busy work.  They hire well-paid experts, supposedly in the field of sexual assaults, [but] they refuse to revisit where these problems seem to have begun.”

This is all based on those cases that are reported.  Many sexual assaults in the military go unreported for fear of retribution of one kind or another.  So if the number of reported cases have been climbing at an alarming rate, how much more so for the number of unreported cases?  It’s like an iceberg with the tip of the iceberg representing the number of reported cases and the hidden larger portion of the iceberg being the number of unreported cases.

The White House advocates behind the lax Pentagon standards argued that by eliminating the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy that it would help increase diversity within the military ranks.  However, I don’t think this is the type of diversity they were anticipating.