Judge Says Christian Innkeeper Violated Rights When Refused to Rent Room to Lesbian Couple

Gay-rights activists are once again celebrating a legal victory that places their sinful lifestyle over the rights of the Christian innkeeper.

In 2007 a lesbian couple, Diane Servelli and Taeko Bufford, of Long Beach, California contacted Aloha Bed and Breakfast in Hawaii seeking to rent a room. Phyllis Young, owner of the bed-and-breakfast him refused to rent a room to the couple when she found out that they were homosexuals. She explained to them that she was a Christian and that her religious beliefs said that homosexuality was wrong and that she would feel uncomfortable with them sleeping together in a room in her home.

Like all in tolerant gays, to lesbian pair were not about to accept the fact that someone else had differing views from their own and ran whining and crying to the Hawaii Civil Rights Commission. Officials at the Hawaii Civil Rights Commission questioned Young about the incident and she confirmed that in fact she had denied to rent a room to lesbian couple because of her religious beliefs. She also told them that she felt that homosexuality is a ‘detestable’ practice and that it ‘defiles our land’.

A judge finally ruled in the case and said that Young did violate the public accommodations law of the state of Hawaii.  The law states that anyone or any business renting lodging to the public cannot discriminate against the lodgers on the grounds of race, sex, religion, sexual preference or gender identification.

Basically, the law states that if you deal with the public in any way, you are not allowed to operate your business according to your own personally religious beliefs.  You are required to chuck them right out the door and into the trash if you deal with the public.  The public has their rights to their beliefs but you as the business owner do not.

Young was defended in court by Alliance Defending Freedom attorney Jim Hochberg, who said the ruling was a direct violation of his client’s First Amendment rights to free speech and religion.  He also warned:

“The public needs to be aware of this decision because it has far-reaching consequences.”

Gay rights activists are constantly on the lookout for Christian business owners.  They practically salivate at the chance to force them to go against their religious beliefs or face being taken to court and paying thousands of dollars in fines or court settlements.  It’s happened to other Christian innkeepers, bakers, florist and photographers.

The whole issue is not about gay rights, but about gay dominance.  Gays are legally allowed to discriminate against Christians, but Christians are not allowed to discriminate against gays.  Gays can say anything they want against Christianity and it’s their First Amendment rights, but let a Christian say anything against a gay and they find themselves in court facing charges of discrimination and/or hate language crimes.

Christians wanting to open their own business have to realize that in today’s America, they have two choices: leave their religious beliefs at home or face being taken to court and possibly losing everything you own.  It’s not fair and it’s not right, but it is today’s secular and hedonistic America.  Or should I say it’s today Sodom and Gomorrah?