Karl Rove Leads Establishment Charge Against Tea Party

The establishment GOP hates the Tea Party. Always has, probably always will.

Since the beginning of the Tea Party, the GOP leadership has tried through bribery, infiltration, nullification and public humiliation to eliminate whatever influence the grass-roots movement has been able to muster.

The heart of the dispute centers around the fact that the Tea Party involves voters from every walk of life, but mostly people who don’t have country club memberships or who are chauffeured around in limousines.

The GOP leadership, however, is drawn from the insular golf and polo set. They’ve attended the right schools, met the right people and kissed the right tushies to get where they are, which is probably right where their parents put them. The most important thing to them is fitting in and keeping the fine wine flowing.

The Tea Party, on the other hand, is a bunch of gate crashers, uncouth workaday slobs who got into the soiree without an invitation. They are the people the leadership expects to show up on Election Day but otherwise stay in their own neighborhoods and out of politics. And for some reason that mystifies the leadership, they expect the GOP to actually adhere to principles of sound government and social responsibility.

Karl Rove’s Conservative Victory Project is just the latest iteration of the GOP leadership’s contempt for Tea Party principles. After taking to the pages of the New York Times to attack the Tea Party and try to blame it for the disastrous election showing by the GOP, Rove is suddenly finding that many of the people he just expects to fall in line and shut up have no intention of doing that.

According to Politico, “deep-pocket conservatives” are turning their backs on Rove, being keenly aware that it was establishment cheerleaders like Rove who were blindsided by Mitt Romney’s stunning loss and losses in many key Senate and House races. It’s also the folks who run the GOP who have let widespread allegations of voter fraud — including counties where Obama won over 100 percent of the vote — go unchallenged and uninvestigated.

Yet it’s conservative voters the GOP cynically appeals to for its continued support. Rove himself has often brought up his ties to the Reagan Administration, ties which Reagan biographer Craig Shirley disputes, pointing out that Rove was a supporter of Gerald Ford and the first George Bush, not Reagan.

Rove’s attack on the Tea Party is gaining him liberal fans who praise his “brave” stance in taking on all the upstarts. When liberals agree with you, it’s time to check your motivations.

To fully understand the background on the GOP’s seeming lack of interest in winning elections or standing up for the conservative principles that made this country, you might have to resort to investigating the ties between individual establishment figures and certain domestic and foreign agencies. It’s murky territory, and the possible answers you may find can be shocking. I won’t go there today but I encourage readers to conduct their own investigations.

Suffice it to say that the establishment has been backstabbing American conservatism since at least the sixties.

Rove has angered the very troops he expects to form his Republican army. If he thinks he’s going to be a general, he needs to rethink his strategy.