Lessons from the Swiss Riots

Finally, the underprivileged classes in Switzerland took it to the streets. Despite the government blackout on any information, we have a video that shows beyond any doubt that there are riots in Switzerland; angry people are destroying property, looting, and showing the rich that they can do whatever they want.

Here’s the video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkEHQgh135c

Awful, isn’t it? Just like Britain.

While Switzerland is in the grip of these terrible riots, let’s see how the Swiss got to this point, and learn the lessons:

First, the Swiss Confederation was started as a free union of free people who refused to let barons – or any other representatives of a professional political or military class – rule over them. Thus, even to this day, there are no professional politicians who make a living out of demagoguery and political deals.

Second, the Swiss from the very beginning until present day acknowledge Christianity to be the ruling religion of the land, even if not all of them actively practice it. Public assaults on Christianity are suppressed – one of the few limitations of that sort in Switzerland. Even as recently as last year the building of new minaret to the mosques in Switzerland was declared illegal by a referendum where more than 60% of the population declared their determination to protect the dominance of the Christian religion in Switzerland. While there are differences between the Protestant and the Roman Catholic cantons, this is as much diversity as the Swiss can afford.

Third, at different times, other ideologies that aim at the subversion of the liberties of the Swiss were suppressed – Nazism and Communism leading the pack. As a result, the Swiss have remained individually free and private property has remained protected against any would-be confiscators.

Fourth, the Swiss never gave up their cantons’ sovereignty in all matters that concern the cantons. Voting on every important issue is by referendum in the canton, not by professional politicians in a remote Parliament or Congress protected by armed police from the love of their constituents.

Fifth, in 1848 the Swiss adopted a federal constitution copied from the US Constitution, with only one difference: no strong central presidency. The executive power remained in the cantons, and the Presidency has no real power. Since then, the Constitution has been amended twice, in 1874 and in 1999, only to further enumerate more strictly the rights of the individuals and of the cantons.

Sixth, Switzerland has very strict gun-control laws: Every male must have an assault rifle in his home. One of the few government sponsored activities are the local “shooting societies” where all Swiss citizens are expected to train to shoot.

Seventh, the Swiss banking system is controlled by private banks that are not bailed out by the government in case they default. This, understandably, keeps both the banks and the central bank very conservative when it comes to credit and money. If you want to know how it affects the currency, look at the latest comparisons between the Swiss frank and gold, and between the Swiss frank and the US Dollar.

Eight, all regulations and taxes are local and are decided by local referendums. The Swiss are apparently very “selfish”; they are not too willing to allow some central government to decide how and where they spend their money and how they conduct their own business.

The result of these terrible policies is obvious:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkEHQgh135c

Awful, isn’t it.