Like a ‘Monkey With a Hand Grenade’ — U.S. Policy in Mideast

It’s just convenient — awfully convenient. That’s all I’m saying.

It’s convenient for U.S. Mideast policy that after three years of covert support for the al-Qaeda mercenaries who lead the Syrian “rebels,” the Obama Administration should suddenly be gifted with an attack on civilians, attributed to the Syrian government, by means of one of the most despised weapons ever devised by mankind: poison gas.

This attack by the Syrian government comes with good timing, just as support was wavering for a publicly acknowledged U.S. military presence in the region.

It also takes attention off the Administration’s mess in Egypt, in which it supported the Nazi-spawned, terrorist Muslim Brotherhood against the Egyptian majority, despite broad evidence of a stolen election. Now that the military has taken over, the Administration has compounded its errors by cutting funding for what may be the best hope for a reasonably moderate democracy in the land of the Pharaohs.

Stepping up the rhetoric about Syria also serves as yet another distraction to keep America from thinking about Benghazi, an attack that occurred not because of an anti-Muslim YouTube video but because the Administration was once again collaborating with terrorists and smugglers to get heavy weapons and personnel into Syria by way of Turkey. Something went sour on that deal, and we wound up with four dead Americans.

As Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin said, the U.S. is like “a monkey with a hand grenade” in the Mideast.

It’s strange to think, after what happened to Saddam Hussein in neighboring Iraq after the world thought he used nerve gas against Kurds, that the Syrian government that has been wrapped up in civil war for three years would suddenly throw caution and international opinion to the wind.

The Syrian government had to know that chemical weapons would be a guaranteed way to get the nations of the world to beat a path to its door.

It’s curious that the Syrians would invite such trouble.

On the other hand, anybody who had an ax to grind with Syria but who wanted to appear worthy of his unearned Nobel Peace Prize would have a lot of incentive to stage a phony attack. … Perhaps someone with delusions of carving out a reinvigorated Muslim caliphate under his personal control.

Yes, such an attack would be very convenient indeed.