Man Reports Eclipse Vision Loss After Using Bogus Glasses


Here it is! It was only a matter of time before the first report came out from someone who had vision damage from either having bogus eclipse glasses or from flat out staring at the eclipse.

Let’s face it, we live in a world filled with idiots, and common sense isn’t all that common. Unfortunately, for one California man, he took the right precautions and still got the short end of the stick. He bough solar eclipse glasses that had fake labeling on it to make them appear as if they were official.

Fox News reports:

 

Dr. Raj Maturi, an ophthalmologist at the Midwest Eye Institute in Indianapolis, Ind., who tracked eclipse cases, told the Indy Star that the man suffered “significant vision loss” after watching the eclipse while wearing glasses that were mislabeled as appropriate eyewear.

“The damage to his retina was in the shape of an eclipse,” the doctor said.

Maturi continued, “The cells are in a middle of a shock from so much energy coming to the eye,” he added, “Unfortunately there’s no treatment that works. If you’re literally burning something, it’s impossible to bring it back to life.”

Maturi said two other patients had experienced damage after looking at the eclipse without eyewear but they did not watch long enough for permanent damage. However, if the patients had watched the eclipse a few seconds more, then they could have received long-lasting damage to their vision, the doctor said.

Maturi said he also received a number of calls from patients who were worried about losing their eyesight after the eclipse, but said there was no need for concern.

He said that it wasn’t simply looking up at the eclipse that was damaging. Looking at it was just like looking at the sun. Staring at it is here the problem comes in because the rays are burning your retinas.

Maturi said, “There were a lot of misconceptions about it,” he continued, “Just being outside is not an issue. It’s staring at the sun. Looking at an eclipse is no different than looking at the sun on a non-eclipse day.”

He did say that maybe it had something to do with age well. “The eyes of younger people tend to have clearer lenses, while their grandparents’ eyes may have cloudier lenses, which may block the glare a tad but not offer anywhere near full protection,” Maturi concluded.

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