Obama Executive Order Parcels Out More of Our Sovereignty

One thing about this president, he sure does love those executive orders.

In between sending emailed threats to the Supreme Court that Medicare recipients would suffer if the justices overturn Obamacare — as reported by Fox News — President Obama got his gnomes to draft a new executive order with the innocuous title of “Promoting International Regulatory Cooperation.”

The touted purpose is to cut red tape and allow U.S. companies that work overseas to grow their businesses more easily. But it’s another piece in the puzzle of U.S. sovereignty that President Obama is handing over to foreign nations.

The order, issued May 1, sets up a White House policy panel to review ways to increase international regulatory cooperation, particularly involving technology.

According to Businessweek, U.S. Chamber of Commerce Vice President Sean Heather said last week, “Today’s executive order marks a paradigm shift for U.S. regulators by directing them to take the international implications of their work into account in a consistent and comprehensive way.”

Buried in the doublespeak is the heart of the executive order, which is that the White House’s appointed policy panel is to consider changing any U.S. trade regulations it or its regulated businesses find inconvenient so that they match laws in foreign countries.

Further, the panel is instructed to consider foreign nations’ regulatory approaches if they are less cumbersome than U.S. law.

If this hasn’t alarmed you yet, consider all the benefits the U.S. has seen from NAFTA (virtually none) vs. the benefits our trading partners have received.

Then consider also that this sort of international regulatory authority usually goes through a period of direct negotiation with our trading partners at the diplomatic level, then is written into a treaty that is presented to Congress for its review and approval.

With this executive order, Obama is once again going around Congress and circumventing constitutional and other legal procedures in a process that will occur far from public scrutiny unless the White House wants to advertise something it’s done.

And given this White House’s record, those events will be few and far between.