Pediatricians Group Seeks to Normalize Teen Homosexuality

The American Academy of Pediatrics is telling members that they should make their offices homosexual friendly by putting up rainbow stickers, offering brochures featuring same-sex couples and take other steps to promote homosexuality and fight “heterosexism.”

And here you thought pediatricians’ primary job was to look after children’s health.

The first sign that the AAP leadership has gone off the deep end into political fantasy land is the swelling number of letters in the abbreviations used to avoid saying “homosexual.”

Apparently we’re now up to LGBTQ — lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and “questioning” — to describe the sexually confused.

“Sexual-minority youth should not be considered abnormal,” according to the new AAP materials released Monday, even though homosexuals still only account for less than 3 percent of the total population.

“There is an emerging literature about resiliency, and about the fact that parental acceptance and parental love, family connectiveness, religious connectiveness and school connectiveness are all very protective against risk behaviors,” lead author Dr. David Levine told the Washington Times.

“Risk behaviors” such as homosexuality? Apparently not.

Pediatricians “should support or create gay-straight alliances at schools, and support the development and enforcement of zero-tolerance policies for homophobic teasing, bullying, harassment and violence,” according to the new policy.

The policy further adds, “Being LGBTQ is normal, just different.” Run that one through the logic filter a few times.

Fortunately, other pediatrician groups exist that haven’t given in to political correctness. “That’s where we would disagree. Major, major disagreement,” said Dr. Den Trumbull, president of the American College of Pediatricians.

“It’s wrong for anyone to be bullied or mocked or stigmatized. At the same time — and I know this is heresy to the lesbian and gay community — I do not think we should normalize these kinds of behaviors and orientations,” Dr. Jerry A. Miller Jr., a pediatrician in Augusta, Ga., told the Times.