Is President Barack Obama to Blame for High Gas Prices?

Gasoline prices are once again soaring.  At time when many families are pinching pennies to keep food on the table and roof over their heads, the last thing they can afford is to see the prices at the pumps jumping up quickly.

Many Americans are turning to the President and blaming him for the high gasoline prices.  His latest approval ratings that just came out, plummeted his all-time record low of 41% and the pollsters are saying that is directly related to the price of gas.

However, a number of experts say that the president is not responsible in the short term for the price increases.  They try to explain that the prices we see at the pumps are the results of years of events that have had an influence on oil prices.  It’s connected to oil exploration, consumer habits and oil consumption, Middle East politics and turmoils, international oil markets (such as China buying more oil than ever before) and even last year’s Japanese earthquake.

While that may be true in one sense, it is inaccurate in trying to take most of the blame off of the President.  Let’s consider the facts that the Obama administration has hindered oil production and exploration in the Gulf of Mexico since taking office.  He has also blocked the development of the oil fields in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and more recently he has blocked the approval of the Keystone XL Pipeline project.

Obama has a policy of blocking energy production and exploration of domestic fossil fuels in favor of more experimental, long range and expensive green alternatives.  He places conservation over American survival and independence.  Ironically, a number of his green projects have been going belly up because they aren’t economically feasible.  Solyndra is the flagship of the Obama green failures and more companies are experiencing the same fate.

Whether the experts want to admit it or not, Obama has a track record of being anti-oil industry friendly and the American people are feeling some of that at the pumps as they pull up and contemplate whether or not they can fill their tanks full or pay the bills.