Religious Freedom Voided by Oregon’s Bureau of Labor and Industries

Oregon’s constitution states the following in Section 3 of Article 1 of the Bill of Rights:

“Freedom of religious opinion. No law shall in any case whatever control the free exercise, and enjoyment of religious opinions, or interfere with the rights of conscience.”

The above sounds ironclad. A person in Oregon can’t be required (forced) to act contrary to his or her religious beliefs unless you decide not to bake a cake for a homosexual marriage.

The owners of Sweet Cakes by Melissa refused, on religious grounds, to create a cake for a homosexual wedding in the same way that an owner of a printing company owned by blacks or Jews (or anybody for that matter) would most likely refuse to print signs and brochures for a KKK march. The KKK has the right to march, but no one should be forced to give support for the march.

One has to wonder if homosexual owners of a baker would make a cake for anti-homosexual event. I wouldn’t try to force them to bake such a cake. I would take my business elsewhere.

The homosexual couple could have gone to another bakery just like the KKK marchers could have gone to another print shop.

But Oregon and other states have created a new class of people based on a certain type of sexual behavior and they want us to comply with that behavior or be forced to pay stiff penalties:

“Under Oregon law, Oregonians may not be denied service based on sexual orientation or gender identity. The law provides an exemption for religious organizations and schools, but does not allow private business owners to discriminate based on sexual orientation, just as they cannot legally deny service based on race, sex, age, disability or religion. The investigation concludes that the bakery is not a religious institution under law and that the business’ policy of refusing to make same-sex wedding cakes represents unlawful discrimination based on sexual orientation.”

So not only are business owners forced to serve people who engage in sexual practices that they find repugnant, but their religious beliefs are also infringed upon. The Oregon Constitution does not include the phrase “only for religious organizations and schools.” The law covers everybody in all situations.

The homosexuals who wanted a cake could have purchased any cake in the bakery. The owners only refused to supply a cake for what they believe is an immoral practice.

This is tyranny of the highest order. If a law can be rewritten in one case, it can be rewritten in other cases. No one is safe from the thought-crimes police that are running the highest levels of government.