Religious Ramblings of Political Pagans

Governor Rick Perry is holding a ‘governors’ day of prayer‘ meeting where governors from around the country will gather, fast, and pray for our troubled nation. For Christians, this is a no-brainer. We are to give thanks to our Creator for the blessings He has bestowed upon us, praise Him, and ask for His forgiveness for our sinfulness. Our Founding Fathers called for National Days of Prayer and Fasting. Leaders of a nation asking God to bring a nation back to God is a wonderful thing. This is also why we ask God to lead our leaders. When they fail to lead, we are doomed. Who better to ask for guidance than the one who mold’s us according to His sovereign will? We are but mere creatures who owe our total allegiance and lives to our Creator (wording found in the Declaration of Independence).

To those who don’t believe in God, I ask, “Why do you care?” If God doesn’t exist, what benefit is there in speaking out against Him? Who are you speaking out against? What does it change if governors pray to God if you say He doesn’t exist? You might say that it gives politicians a divine mandate for their actions. Is this any different from claims by politicians that they have a mandate from the people?

Those who are speaking out against Governor Perry point to the Constitutional myth that the First Amendment speaks of a ‘Separation of Church and State.’ No matter your stance, the church is not involved.  Governor Perry is not bound by the First Amendment because the prohibition is against what Congress can and cannot do: “Congress,” the Federal law-making body, “shall make no law . . .” The First Amendment limits the power of Congress, not the states. Anyway, Governor Perry is not making any law.

Anyone unfamiliar with the First Amendment would do well to read it and follow its logic. It’s quite simple to understand:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. (Emphasis mine)

Logic, backed up by quite a bit of history, requires that if no law can be made prohibiting or establishing one religion over another, Governor Perry, or any politician for that matter, can hold a day or time of prayer whenever he so pleases. Continue on, sir. Ignore the ramblings.