Sen. Harkin, The Civil War Was About Freeing Slaves Not Making Slaves

Democrats like Tom Harkin are comparing opposition to an increase in the power and authority of the State to the Civil War.

Iowa Democrat Tom Harkin is the worst offender of the comparison. Since Democrat politics feeds off of racial politics, we all knew that sooner or later the image of slavery, couched in civil war language, had to come up.

Without coming right out and saying it, Sen. Harkin hopes to impart the image that Republicans who oppose the nation’s first black president and his signature and legacy-establishing healthcare legislation are like southern slave owners.

To put it simply, what Harkin is really saying is that Republican opposition to ObamaCare is really opposition to Obama because he’s black.

Here’s Harkin’s Civil War analogy:

“It’s dangerous. It’s very dangerous. I believe, Mr. President, we are at one of the most dangerous points in our history right now. Every bit as dangerous as the break-up of the Union before the Civil War.

If we follow the general consensus about the Civil War, it was about freeing slaves not making slaves.

ObamaCare is about making slaves. Yes, a lot of people will get subsidized healthcare and many more people will be taxed for that healthcare. That is double slavery. Those who receive the benefit becomes wards of the States, and those who are taxed to pay for the financing of the subsidized are turned into forced laborers to the State.

Republican opposition to ObamaCare is opposition to State-sanctioned slavery in the name of fairness.

Slavery comes in a number of forms. Steven Yates and Ray E. Bornert point out the following in their article “Is the Income Tax a Form of Slavery?”:

“[S]lavery is non-ownership of one’s Person and Labor. It is involuntary servitude. A slave must work under a whip, real or figurative, wielded by other persons, his owners, with no say in how (or even if) his labors are compensated. His is a one-way contract he cannot opt out of. A slave is tied to his master (and to the land where he labors). He cannot simply quit if he doesn’t like it. Moreover, a slave can be bought and sold like any other commodity.”

In the Lincoln-Douglas debates, Lincoln stated that every person has the natural right “to eat the bread which he has earned by the sweat of his brow.”

The phrase was not unique to Lincoln. John Winthrop (1587/8–1649), Governor of the Plymouth Colony, wrote the following in his Journal in 1642, “So many enemies doth the Lord arm against our daily bread, that we might know that we are to eat it in the sweat of our own brows.”

Consider how we might look at taxation if each day we had to stop our productive work and march off to some government facility and work directly for the State or other people.

There are better ways to solve our so-called healthcare crisis (it’s always a crisis) without enslaving have the nation.