Should Illegal Aliens Be Allowed to Practice Law in U.S.?

In 1978, the Garcia family illegally crossed the U.S./Mexico border into California.  They have remained in the U.S. ever since.  At the time of their illegal crossing, their son Sergio was only 17 months old.

Sergio Garcia has grown up in the United States and taken advantage of the educational system by earning a high school diploma.  He went on to attend Chico State University in the beautiful Sacramento Valley in northern California.  After graduating from Chico State, Sergio went on to obtain a law degree from Cal Northern School of Law.  In 2009, he passed the California state bar exam, but was denied acceptance to the state bar association because he technically was still an illegal alien.

Sergio then filed suit against the state bar association seeking permission to practice law in the state of California.  His case is now before the California State Supreme Court who will have to decide whether or not Garcia will be allowed to practice law, even though he is in the United States illegally, but their decision can have much broader ramifications in the future.

Garcia said:

“This case stopped being about me a long time ago.  The outcome is going to have a major impact on future generations of attorneys and people in my situation. At least they will have good guidance.”

A number of people feel compassion on the children of illegals and want to hand them legal rights without any forethought of how this affects others.  They say that it’s not the children’s fault and they should not be punished for the illegal actions of their parents.  My response to that is what about the children of parents here in the United States that commit other crimes and are subsequently imprisoned.  The families left behind often lose their homes and are penalized for years in one way or another for their parents indiscretions.  So why should the children of people who break federal immigration laws be any different.  If their parents broke the law, that has to be dealt with.

My other argument is that if someone like Sergio Garcia wants to be law abiding and practice law here in the United States, then why hasn’t he gone through the legal process of becoming a U.S. citizen?

To allow Garcia to become a member of the bar and practice law, even though he is an illegal citizen makes a mockery of the families who worked for years to become U.S. citizens legally.  I know a family that desperately wanted to get their family out of South Africa because of the violence and hatred for whites.  They followed the U.S. guidelines and at one point had to leave their teenage daughter behind with relatives and hope that they could get her out to the U.S. soon.  It took several more years and thousands of dollars, but they finally were able to bring their daughter over to the U.S. legally.  In the years that followed, they went through the citizenship process and are now legal U.S. citizens.

They tell me that the problem with illegal aliens in the U.S. and how the government is giving them everything and allowing them to stay in the country is atrocious and offensive.  This family worked long and hard to do everything the legal way while families like the Garcia’s do it illegally and are now filing a lawsuit to take further advantage of our system and way of life.

In my opinion, if Sergio Garcia wants to practice law anywhere in the United States, then let him first follow the law and become a legal U.S. citizen.  Then apply to the state bar association, but do not reward him for pursuing what he knows to be illegal, immoral and offensive to legal immigrants.