North Carolina Voters Ban Gay Marriage, Domestic Partners

Despite campaign pleas from President Clinton and the disapproval of President Obama, North Carolina voters on Tuesday joined the majority of states that have changed their constitutions to ban gay marriage.

In a solid win projected at 61 to 39 percent by the Associated Press, the state’s voters rewrote their constitution so that the only valid “domestic legal partnership” recognized is marriage between a man and a woman.

Opponents of the ban raised more than twice as much money as supporters, including funds that poured in from out of state. Most of the money for the opposition came from individual donations, including numerous large contributions. The supporters received more money from nonprofit groups.

Immediately after the vote, the AP and other liberal media began trying to diminish the clear victory for traditional marriage supporters by citing polls that claimed fewer than half of voters understood the amendment would ban gay civil unions as well, and other polls claiming most voters actually supported gay civil unions.

The new amendment means that municipalities that have been giving benefits to gays in civil unions will no longer be allowed to do so.

Twenty-nine states have included bans on gay marriage in their constitutions. While some have banned gay marriage through the normal legislative process, altering a state’s constitution is considered by marriage proponents to be more likely to withstand the inevitable legal challenges.

Only six states so far have decided to issue “marriage” licenses to gay couples: Massachusetts, Connecticut, Iowa, New York, New Hampshire and Vermont. Washington, D.C., also issues licenses to gay couples. Washington and Maryland have passed laws to allow gay marriages, but they are currently being blocked by legal challenges.

California is in a sort of legal limbo on gay marriage as Proposition 8, which was declared unconstitutional by the infamous Ninth Circus Court of Appeals, is appealed up the legal food chain.

Worldwide, only 10 countries allow gay marriages: Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Iceland, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, South Africa and Sweden — hardly a who’s-who of great nations. A handful of other countries recognize gay marriages performed in other countries.

Marriage is a fundamental part of the human experience and main pillar of human society, but it is under such attack these days from all corners, including supporters of so-called gay marriage, it’s encouraging to see voters of another state get past the politics and stand up for the traditional institution.