State Department Creates Time Paradox, Says It Never Blamed Video in Libya Attacks

Marty McFly must have been playing around with sports almanacs in the DeLorean again because George McFly is dead, Biff is owner of a successful casino and the State Department never blamed a cheaply made YouTube video for the deaths of four Americans in Libya.

According to Congressman Darrell Issa, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and other State Department officials in a conference call Tuesday claimed that they never believed the attack on the embassy in Libya was linked to a protest over the video “Innocence of Muslims,” which has been roundly condemned by Clinton, President Obama and other Administration officials.

So that wasn’t Clinton a couple of days after the attacks in Libya, Egypt and elsewhere telling the world that the U.S. didn’t support the video that at the time was being blamed for all the violence. And those weren’t State Department ads in Pakistan distancing the U.S. from the video which Clinton blamed in the ads for the violence. And that wasn’t the State Department telling U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice that the video was the cause of all the uproar. And that definitely wasn’t King Obama sticking to the video story in front of the United Nations. And those certainly weren’t government MIBs arresting the video’s maker in the dead of night under the pretense of a parole violation.

I didn’t realize that time travel technology had been developed to this point that Administration officials could actually go back in time, “un-say” something and set up a parallel timeline.

But it clearly works, because as I peruse the television and cable news, I’m noticing people seemingly getting in line with the new reality. By this time tomorrow, there will have never been a reality where the Administration tried to blame a straw man for its glaringly incompetent handling of Libya and Mideast security.

The congressional hearing Wednesday on the Benghazi terrorist attack decimated the house of lies built by the Obama Administration since Sept. 11. But that didn’t stop the new time line from rolling into the narrative like a wave.

The new reality is that inadequate intelligence caused the State Department to underestimate the security need in Benghazi.

It’s already running into trouble, however, because Director of National Intelligence James Clapper has denied that his office did anything wrong and said he’d had “enough already” with taking the fall. Also, reports from numerous sources that the Libyan ambassador and his security team had made multiple requests for more security that were denied tends to put the kibosh on the whole “failed intelligence” line.

You have to be careful with time travel. If sci-fi has taught us anything, it’s that too many contradictions to the new time line can cause reality to snap back unexpectedly, revealing all those little secrets that were the point of changing the story in the first place — such as that Michele Bachmann was right to question Muslim Brotherhood-linked personnel working as Clinton’s aide.

In fiction circles, particularly comic books and TV series, this sort of going back in time to alter essential plot points is sometimes called a “retcon,” short for “retroactive continuity.” Lois Lane always knew Clark Kent’s secret; Batman is evil; Captain America was not in World War II; the Green Goblin never died; the Obama Administration never believed that the president’s charming smile and killing Osama bin Laden was security enough against al-Qaida or covered up its own incompetence — those are all examples of retcons.

And that’s what this new story by the State Department is.

Anything else would just be a lie.