Texas Supreme Court Slams Door on Houston’s Lesbian Mayor


One would think that a southern city with such ties to the financial and oil industries would be somewhat conservative, but that’s not the case with Houston, Texas. In 2009, the citizens of Houston elected Annise Parker, a lesbian and gay activist, to be their mayor. Then they re-elected her two more times since then.

Last year, Parker pushed an ordinance through the Houston city council that extended privileged benefits to same-sex partners. That action alone should have raised concerns about a conflict of interest since Parker is married to her lesbian partner, but no one questioned her motive.

However, a number of Houston’s Christian leaders were concerned and filed for an injunction to stop the ordinance from taking effect and they mounted a petition drive to place the ordinance on the ballot. Like most gay activists who claim to be tolerant, Parker went ballistic and launched an all-out war against those Christian leaders.

In response to their legal challenge, Parker’s office issued subpoenas demanding copies of the sermons and correspondence of five of Houston’s Christian pastors. After receiving so much negative publicity and public outcry, Parker’s office withdrew the subpoenas, only to re-issue them a short time later. The second subpoenas eliminated the request for copies of the sermons, but still demanded to see all correspondence between the pastors and their congregations.

In the meantime, the petition drive to gather signatures was quite successful. They gathered 55,000 signatures, which is three times the minimum number needed to place the measure on the ballot.

According to sworn testimony from Anna Russell, the city secretary for more than 40 years, she validated the signatures and declared that the petitions met the minimum requirements. However, an attorney for Parker has filed a brief with the Texas Supreme Court claiming that the drive to put the measure on the ballot has no claim in court because the petitions were never validated.

After the city tried to invalidate most of the signatures, the matter went to a lower court who sided with the city. The matter then went before the Texas Supreme Court. Last Friday, the state’s high court issued their ruling which amounts to slamming the door on Houston’s vengeful lesbian mayor,

Jonathan Saenz, President of Taxes Values told OneNewsNow:

“… The court ruling is a total victory for the people of Houston and for free speech… The court ruled that the anti-religious freedom and LGBT ordinance by the city of Houston has to be stopped; they can’t enforce it. And [the court has] ordered that the city council either repeal the ordinance or place it for the ballot in November. That’s what the people have wanted all along, and finally justice was served.”

One of the attorneys involved in taking the case to the high court commented:

“… There was bipartisan support against this ordinance, but when you have a lesbian mayor who’s rogue and uses dictator-style tactics to try to get her way, that’s what happens.”

“But thankfully on this issue the Texas Supreme Court and faith leaders in the city of Houston saved the day.”

To no surprise, Parker is determined to fight the state Supreme Court’s ruling. She declared that the high court is wrong and vows to find a way to legally challenge it.

She has no desire to seek the will of the people of Houston. Instead, she wants to follow the example set by the top Democrat in America, Barack Obama, and ram her own personal desires down the throats of Houston’s citizens and has no problem using Obama-like dictatorial means to accomplish it. Praise God that the Texas Supreme Court has stopped her, at least for now.

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