The Media’s Lying Propaganda about Texas Homeschool Case


A court case involving a Texas Christian homeschool family has made national news because the parents allegedly have refused to educate their children in view of an imminent “rapture.” Liberal activist news outlets across the country have joined in universal chorus condemning lax homeschooling regulations and suggesting the pending Texas Supreme Court case will lead to a crackdown on homeschooling throughout the nation.

There’s only one problem. It’s all lies.

Every bit of it.

The story popped into my social media existence the other day when someone suggested I should comment on the effects of premillennial eschatology upon the family’s alleged actions. That would certainly be proper if it were true (and it may be, but no one knows for sure), but delving into the case history reveals that the liberal activists’ rabid attack on Christian homeschooling is the important focus here.

For example, the Associated Press (uncritically cut-and-pasted by a local media outlet) spun the story this way:

Laura McIntyre began educating her nine children more than a decade ago inside a vacant office at an El Paso motorcycle dealership she ran with her husband and other relatives.

Now the family is embroiled in a legal battle the Texas Supreme Court hears next week that could have broad implications on the nation’s booming home-school ranks. The McIntyres are accused of failing to teach their children educational basics because they were waiting to be transported to heaven with the second coming of Jesus Christ.

At issue: Where do religious liberty and parental rights to educate one’s own children stop and obligations to ensure home-schooled students ever actually learn something begin? . . .

Like other Texas home-school families, Laura and her husband Michael McIntyre weren’t required to register with state or local educational officials. They also didn’t have to teach state-approved curriculums or give standardized tests.

But problems began when the dealership’s co-owner and Michael’s twin brother, Tracy, reported never seeing the children reading, working on math, using computers or doing much of anything educational except singing and playing instruments. He said he heard one of them say learning was unnecessary since “they were going to be raptured.”

Did you hear that: “. . . could have broad implications on the nation’s booming home-school ranks”? Wow! And the “issue”: “Where do religious liberty and parental rights to educate one’s own children stop and obligations to ensure home-schooled students ever actually learn something begin?”

Brietbart reports how several media outlets carried similar spin, all universally suggesting the family was in the wrong and, in fact, shaming them:

Texas liberal news outlets blasted religious liberty as on a “collision course” with homeschool. National headlines lamented if homeschoolers learned anything at all. The Washington Post pondered where did the line between religious liberty and parental rights to educate one’s own children stop. CBS News, like many news organizations, regurgitated the Associated Press’ narrative which scrutinized if Texas homeschoolers even have to learn.

The Daily Beast attacked Laura McIntyre as the “Kim Davis” of homeschooling. It went on and on claiming that hope was around the corner — because the McIntyre case could change homeschooling laws for the state’s approximately 300,000 home educated students.

But again, it’s all lies. Here are the facts that none of these outlets relates (I’ve only seen one point partially touched in passing by one story so far):

Read the rest of the story at American Vision.

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