The NAACP’s Fear of Mitt Romney

The operating assumption of an organization like the NAACP is any criticism of President Obama is because he’s black. How many times have we heard liberals in general and blacks in particular play the race card any time either President Obama or Attorney General Holder is called on to explain their policies and actions? “It’s racial politics at its worst,” we hear over and over again.

So what should we say to the NAACP when at their annual meeting they booed Mitt Romney? Is booing a white guy at an all-black event racist? Of course not. Blacks can’t be racists because they don’t have “power.” Only people who have power can be racists, and white people have all the power.

Of course, this is nonsense. Blacks got Obama elected in 2008. Nearly 96 percent of blacks voted for Obama. Now that’s power. There’s a great deal of power in the fact that blacks can’t be racists no matter what they say or do.

Then there’s the black power that keeps other blacks down financially. That’s the greatest power of them all, and that’s the power that the NAACP doesn’t want to lose . . . can’t afford to lose.

Many so-called leaders in the black community need a perpetual underclass in order to stay in power. This makes them racists because it gives them power over poor people. Poor blacks are needed for their votes. A white guy like Mitt Romney coming in and talking about jobs and entrepreneurship is a threat to the NAACP. If more blacks joined the middle class, there won’t be a need for NAACP-types.

To the NAACP, most blacks aren’t capable enough to save money, defer gratification, have a bank account, or even think about entrepreneurship. Am I exaggerating? Charlotte Stoker-Manning is a chairwoman of Women in the NAACP. Here’s what she said about Mitt Romney after his speech:

“I believe [Romney’s] vested interests are in white Americans. You cannot possibly talk about jobs for black people at the level he’s coming from. He’s talking about entrepreneurship, savings accounts — black people can barely find a way to get back and forth from work.”

According to Stoker-Manning, blacks aren’t capable of such things. If a white person had said this, liberals everywhere would be describing the comments as racist, and they would be right. But because a black person said them, it’s being “real.”

Let’s put Stoker-Manning’s words in the mouth of Mitt Romney: “I can’t possibly talk about jobs, entrepreneurship, and savings accounts to you. You can barely find a way to get back and forth from work.”

Booker T. Washington (1865–1915) warned of people like Stoker-Manning in his 1911 book My Larger Education. He described them as “problem profiteers”:

“There is another class of coloured people who make a business of keeping the troubles, the wrongs and the hardships of the Negro race before the public. Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs – partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays. Some of these people do not want the Negro to lose his grievances, because they do not want to lose their jobs.”

If the patient gets well, an entire industry of victimhood will get cancer and die. This would be the best thing for the black community. Until blacks throw off the shroud of victimhood, they will be at the mercy of “doctors” who treat a cancer that does not exist but that they are paying for.