The Willful Corruption of Your Minor Children

In 2011, the Archie Comic book franchise announced that it was adding a homosexual character to join Archie, Jughead, Veronica, and Betty. “Life with Archie,” issue 16, features an “interracial, same-sex wedding of character Lt. Kevin Keller, a white American soldier wounded in Iraq, and Clay Walker, the black physical therapist who helped him recover.” Naturally, the homosexual-inspired series was lauded by homosexual groups and the American Civil Liberties Union.

The choice of black soldier is designed to promote the belief that racial prejudice is equal to prejudice against homosexuals. The comparison is a false one since race is not a behavior. It’s the sexual action of people who claim the homosexual lifestyle that we object to just like we’re opposed to adultery, pedophilia, and polygamy.

Who’s buying the series? Is it unsuspecting parents who have fond memories of the original Archie series? Parents beware. The new Archie will corrupt, confuse, and make your children susceptible to homosexual predators. I suspect that the well organized homosexual network is behind sales:

According to the Hollywood Reporter, . . . [the] four-issue miniseries in 2011 sold out, and the homosexual character is getting his own solo series starting in February 2012 that will go back to his teenage years and see him get elected president of Riverdale High School.

When comic books first appeared, children were the market. Most comics stressed traditional moral themes. While there was a dark side to Batman (he was called the “Dark Night”), who made his first appearance in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939, he was not a moral iconoclast. “Orphaned by a thug who shot both his parents,” a ten-year-old “Bruce Wayne swore ‘to avenge their deaths by spending the rest of [his] life warring on all criminals.’”1 Superman was noted as an advocate of “truth, justice, and the American way.”

 

How Times and Comics Have Changed

Today, comics are being used to make social statements, especially in the area of homosexuality. I’ve seen this trend develop since the early 1990s. In the March 1992 issue of Marvel’s Alpha Flight comic book series, Northstar, a former (fictional) Canadian Olympic athlete, decides to come out of the closet after seeing the ravaging effect that AIDS has had on an abandoned baby. He decides to adopt the infant AIDS victim. At one point in the story, he cries out, “I am gay.” Here’s the full panel:

“For while I am not inclined to discuss my sexuality with people for whom it is none of their business — I am gay.”

Now it seems that it’s all homosexuals want to discuss, and they want children to be taught about their preferred sexual choices in government schools. California now requires that homosexuality be portrayed in public schools in a positive manner. History textbooks will be rewritten to include the agenda. Randy Thomasson, president of SaveCalifornia.com, a leading statewide pro-family organization promoting moral virtues for the common good, says, “Children will be taught to support the political activism of ‘Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex and Questioning’ (LGBTIQ) political groups, as the bill requires ‘particular emphasis on portraying the role of these groups in contemporary society.’” Comic books and popular media have softened up young people to be accepting of the homosexual lifestyle.

It’s no surprise that the editors at The New York Times celebrated the favorable treatment of homosexuality in comic books: “[T]he new story lines suggest that gay Americans are gradually being accepted in mainstream popular culture. . . . Mainstream culture will one day make its peace with gay Americans. When that time comes, Northstar’s revelation will be seen for that it is: a welcome indicator of social change.”2

So what happened to the Alpha Flight series? It went through three incarnations. The third series lasted 12 issues. After the cancellation of Alpha Flight, Northstar appeared in his own miniseries, which ignored his sexuality. He pops up in other comics as Marvel works his homosexuality in story lines when it can. In 2005, he was killed by a brainwashed Wolverine. Like so many superheroes — remember “The Death of Superman” issue? — Northstar came back to life without any mention of his homosexual lifestyle. Openly homosexual film producer and novelist Perry Moore (1971–2011) was so upset about Marvel’s betrayal in killing off Northstar that he wrote Hero, a novel about a homosexual teenage superhero.

The New York Times, in order to justify its support of homosexuality, compared discrimination of homosexuals with the discrimination of blacks, women, and the handicapped. “Marvel, beginning in the early 1960’s, was the pioneer in comic book diversity. Marvel published ‘Daredevil,’ a dynamic crime fighter who was also blind. Then came ‘The X‑Men,’ a band of heroes led by a scientist whose mental powers more than compensated for his confinement to a wheelchair. And with ‘Powerman,’ ‘The Black Panther,’ and ‘Sgt. Fury,’ Marvel offered black heroes when blacks in the movies were playing pimps and prostitutes.”3 We shouldn’t forget Wonder Woman who brought equality to the fair sex more than sixty years ago in All Star Comics #8 (December 1941). Of course, none of these fictional characters were identified by a perverse sexual addiction.

The second largest comic company, DC comics, publisher of Batman and Superman, introduced a homosexual character — the Pied Piper — and AIDS‑related themes in their Flash series (August 1991). “Future issues [of Flash] will have the Pied Piper bring a male date to a wedding, and discuss the importance of protecting yourself from exposure to AIDS.”4 I don’t know if this ever happened. If anyone knows, please get in touch with me.

The goal of parading homosexual “heroes” is to get young people — who will one day be decision makers — accustomed to seeing homosexual characters in positions of leadership and authority. Gary Stewart, former president of Marvel Entertainment Group, had this to say about the introduction of their homosexual “superhero”: “And at the time that . . . the team was created, Northstar . . . was considered to be gay by the creator. [In earlier issues] there were hints that he was. There was no direct admission at that time. We believe that the only message here, per se, is the fact that we do preach tolerance. Just as you have in every day society, you have gay individuals and straight individuals. We happen to have one character in the Marvel universe, which exceeds two thousand characters, that happens to be gay.”5

The New York Times, being a bit more honest than the people at Marvel, took an advocacy position. The editors wrote that it was “welcome news.” Since the comic book audience is made up mostly of teenagers, that group “will benefit most from discussions about sexuality and disease prevention.”6 According to the Times, Northstar’s homosexuality should be treated like race, physical handicaps, and gender differences. There is a problem with the analogy: homosexuality is a behavioral choice. No one chooses blindness, racial makeup, physical handicaps, or gender. And given a choice, people with physical handicaps, genetic or not, would like their disabilities reversed.

Today’s comic books that push homosexual themes are all about advocacy. It’s a way for them to get inside the mind of a child without the parent being present. Parents beware.

  1. James Steranko, History of Comics, 2 vols. (Reading, PA: A Supergraphics Publication, 1970), 1:43. Emphasis in original. Co-creator Bill Finger writes: “Bruce Wayne’s first name came from Robert Bruce, the Scottish patriot. []
  2. “The Comics Break New Ground, Again,” The New York Times (January 24, 1992), A12. []
  3. “The Comics Break New Ground, Again,” A12. []
  4. “Comic Book Hero Says He’s Gay,” The Gwinnett Daily News (January 17, 1992), 4A. []
  5. Interview from “Point of View,” #2274 (January 17, 1992), P.O. Box 30, Dallas, Texas 75221. []
  6. “The Comics Break New Ground, Again,” The New York Times (January 24, 1992), A12. []