U.S. News & World Report Editor Calls Obama Campaign Dishonest and Divisive

Just when I thought that most of the main stream media outlets were so married to Barack Obama and the liberal Democratic Party, I see a glimmer of truth surface.

Mortimer B Zuckerman, editor-in-chief of U.S. News & World Report, and one of the wealthiest men in the country, described the Obama campaign as being dishonest and divisive.  In his opinion piece Romney Can Still Overcome Obama’s Dishonest, Divisive Campaign, Zuckerman believes that if Romney outlines his plans on how he will get America back to work that he can beat Obama in November.

Zuckerman explains that the blunders made by Romney have just made things easy for the Obama campaign.  He describes Romney’s comment problems:

“The trouble with Romney—and for Romney—is that he has etched an unappealing sketch of himself. For independent voters, he made too many flip-flops in policy to appease the right. Indeed, he had an uncanny knack for offering an easy target for his opposition: ‘I like being able to fire people,’ ‘I’m also unemployed,’ ‘I’m not concerned about the very poor,’ and ‘Ann drives a couple of Cadillacs.’ He seems to be living in another world, referring to middle income as being in the range of “$200,000 to $250,000,” when the median income is more like $50,000.”

It is all of these blunders that have allowed the Obama campaign to lie and deceive people by saying:

“Such careless remarks have made it easy for the Obama campaign to get away with a program that pits “the millionaires and billionaires” against the people. It is a dishonest, divisive campaign. It’s discouraging of enterprise. It does the opposite of uniting the country to deal with the current economic crisis.”

If Romney is really wanting to win the election, according to Zuckerman, he has to start laying out specifics of how he plans on creating jobs and improving the economy.  His advice to the GOP campaign is:

“What Romney must do from now on with more conviction, more specifics, and more clarity is to outline just how he will get America back to work after four years of a demoralizing economy that, in American politics, is held to be the responsibility of the incumbent president. It is not enough to talk about creating 12 million new jobs in his first term, which is the common prediction of the likely course anyway. It’s still ‘the economy, stupid’ that matters, and Romney has time to spell out how he would hope to do much better than an administration fixated on government, deficits, and regulations.”

“Romney’s new language talks about appealing to the 100 percent. He will be doing well to reach 50 percent. But he still has a chance at reversing the weak position if he will go all out on the economy, discourage personal attacks on the president (who is well liked anyway), and always remember the injunction the British were faced with every day when World War II started, ‘Loose talk costs lives. Think before you talk.’”

I’ve heard many others asking when Romney will start to lay out any details on how he plans to carry out his campaign promises.  Making promises is one thing, but fulfilling those promises is another.  Obama has filled very few of his promises and yet he still has a good chance of being elected, if Romney doesn’t learn to stop saying stupid things.  And unfortunately, people judge a candidate on what and how they speak, not on their past performance.  If that were the case, Romney would win with a landslide victory.  The next few weeks will divulge all.