Useless: Getting Holder To Promise To Stop Spying

After pointing out the amazing way Holder asked for an “off the record” meeting with the media about spying on the media, I didn’t plan to write a follow up. But “Tyler Durden” at Zero Hedge made a great point about the content of that meeting that demands our attention.

“Durden” comments on a Russia Today report, which means someone reported to them what happened at the meeting. I don’t know if Holder thinks the person who leaked the information has “violated the rules of the meeting” or not. Perhaps he is going to be wise enough to keep quiet about it because even he can see the bitter irony that would occur if the man who spied on the media and broke (whether he will admit it or not) the longstanding rules of American society to do so, now starts whining about people revealing his private information. In the meantime, the rest of us can only hope that a great deal more of Eric Holders “private” laundry comes into view.

Of course, since Holder is doing things that massively affect the public, from spying on journalists to walking guns into Mexico, none of the information the public needs from him is really private.

The Russia Today headline says it all: “Holder tells reporters he’ll stop spying on them.”

“’[Holder and aides] completely endorsed the president’s statement that reporters should not be at legal risk for doing their job. They acknowledged the need for changes in their own guidelines and the need to have a more rigorous internal review,’ Martin Baron added in the Washington Post. But even if the DoJ acknowledged those changes, eyewitnesses say it’s not certain when or how adjustments will be implemented. While most attendees say that Holder and Cole seemed understanding of their grievances, few walked away with feeling fulfilled about promises that have yet to be cemented. ‘I didn’t come away with a precise understanding of how those guidelines might change, and I didn’t have impression they were settled in their own mind,” Byers added for a separate Politico article. ‘Who knows what’s going to happen if they in fact are going to practice what they seem to preach and try to change some laws that we feel are very relevant. But I think it’s sort of an opening gambit, an opening discussion,’ New York Daily News Washington bureau chief Jim Warren told CNN.”

As “Durden” puts it,

“Summarizing: a secret meeting with the same press that was being spied on for who knows how long, promising that the administration will be more transparent, and to take the AG’s word for it, the same AG who is being investigated for perjury before Congress.”

Despite the media’s long overdue negative reaction to Holder, they obviously still don’t get it. To demand that the Department of Justice change “their own guidelines” for “more rigorous internal review” is to demand that the Department of Justice is still empowered to secretly spy on journalists.

We want all government agencies, including the Department of Justice, to be bound by the courts to the Fourth Amendment. Anything less is a tyrant’s coup.