‘Vetting’ of Refugees Has Failed Before


The White House wants you to believe after the Paris massacres that it can safely bring thousands of Muslim refugees into this country by carefully “vetting” each one to be sure they aren’t terrorists.

Considering that vetting of people from foreign countries where they barely keep records mostly relies on self-filled forms and the off chance that an immigrant might have a fingerprint file, that’s slim to no guarantee that the government isn’t allowing a terrorist or even a wannabe bomb maker into the country.

After all, federal agencies have allowed terrorists into the country before.

ABC News has reminded its viewers of an investigation it did in 2013 that discovered that dozens of suspected terrorist bomb makers were allowed into the United States as “refugees” of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

At least two of those were al-Qaeda terrorists who had killed U.S. soldiers and copped a plea bargain after being caught with heavy weapons while living in Bowling Green, Kentucky.

The two men were seen on video at a storage locker handling a Russian machine gun and a Stinger missile launcher, according to ABC. At least one of the men had been detained in Iraq as an insurgent in 2006, so his fingerprints were in the system.

As a result of that case, the refugee settlement program was suspended for six months in 2009, a fact the Obama Administration hid from Congress.

After the investigation of last week’s Paris massacres found that at least one of the terrorists had come to Europe as a Syrian refugee, the governors of at least 31 states have refused to allow entry to Syrian refugees the White House is insisting on importing. Republicans in Congress are looking at restricting funding for the refugee program unless security can be ensured.

It’s not an unfounded concern. Earlier this week, Border Patrol officers reported capturing eight Syrians in two groups trying to sneak into the country at Laredo, Texas.

In late September, a Syrian illegal immigrant was apprehended using someone else’s passport in Texas. U.S. officials declined to prosecute, however, citing “circumstances,” according to Breitbart.

This all comes amid a new surge in unaccompanied children trying to cross the border. Officials say the numbers are the highest they’ve seen since the summer of 2014.

With FBI officials recently reporting that they were working around 1,000 ISIS-related cases across the country, many people are getting understandably nervous.

The obvious truth is that despite White House assurances, vetting can and does fail on a regular basis, leaving it up to an increasingly stretched FBI and other law enforcement agencies to catch any terrorists before they can pull the trigger.

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