What’s a Little Secret Email Account Among Enemies?


Here we go again, another scandal from the Obama Administration, this one involving Hillary Clinton.

Oh, and news flash: The sun will rise tomorrow.

Nonetheless, let’s dive in, shall we?

Clinton, the queen of subterfuge, is now being caught up the news that during her entire tenure as secretary of state, she and at least four of her top aides failed to use secure government email accounts as required by law.

Instead, all their emails conducting official business, including any classified information that may have contained, went through and were stored on the web server Clinton keeps in her own home.

I’m sure the Clintons have guards galore around their houses, but I’m less certain about the fence of cybersecurity measures surrounding the old i386 in the basement, even if the email domain is cleverly registered to an apparently nonexistent person named Eric Hoteman.

Ratchet that concern up a few notches when you realize that one of the aides using the exclusive Clintonemail.com address was Huma Abedin, long thought by critics to be a mole for the Muslim Brotherhood.

(That email domain, by the way, was set up on the same day as the beginning of Hillary’s Senate confirmation hearings. If that’s not intent, I don’t know what is.)

Clinton’s use of the private email server is apparently the reason so many Freedom of Information Act requests have been denied by the State Department in recent memory for lack of any documentation: All the documents are sitting on the old chest of drawers downstairs at Hillary’s home.

Clinton is making a show, as she is wont to do, of being open, saying on Twitter that she wants the State Department to release her emails to the public. Of course, the emails she’s talking about are some 50,000 pre-screened pages, a fraction of what is believed to be on her server.

Clinton of course has a long history of hiding documents and generally playing fast and loose with rules regarding national security, from blocking release of emails pertaining to Benghazi, to involvement with “missing” Whitewater documents, stretching all the way back to Watergate, when she and an aide for Ted Kennedy, the senator from Chappaquiddick, were accused of taking documents and falsifying a legal brief with the intent of keeping President Nixon in office long enough to ensure a Democratic victory in 1976.

Breitbart is running an interesting story today reminding readers that in the midst of the whirlwind of petulant vandalism that Clinton staffers left behind as the Bush Administration moved in, there was a supposedly secure phone in the first lady’s office left open with the key in it.

Media Matters has already declared that there’s no scandal here in these latest revelations, certainly no violation of the law, so you know we’re on to something.

The question is, will anybody in any official capacity do anything about it?

The correct answer is “no.”

When Clinton was screaming at a congressional hearing looking into her role in Benghazi, she may have called it.

We are living in the age of “What does it matter?”

For the zombie hordes, it doesn’t matter. This kind of stuff just flies right over their heads, and they never look up.

That this information is coming out at all probably has to do with the intense hatred President Obama and his advisers have for Clinton. He never liked her, from the start, and he only gave her the secretary of state gig to keep her quiet, in an example of keeping your enemies closer.

But ever since Clinton and CIA Director Leon Panetta went behind Valerie Jarrett’s back in order to kill Osama bin Laden (keeping Obama out of the loop until the last instant), the daggers have been out.

Clinton has been eyeing the Oval Office ever since her husband left it. “First woman president” and all that liberal blah blah.

Will this make a dent in her drive for supreme power? Not likely.

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