Young Voters Abandoning Obama, Democrats

President Obama first won office in 2008 with heavy support from young voters, and the support of the so-called millennials has been seen as crucial to his ongoing success.

That being the case, Obama might want to start paying more attention to those young people because the youngest voters are starting to turn against him and his policies, particularly the Affordable Care Act, according to a Harvard survey.

The survey conducted by the Institute of Politics found that while support for Obama among millennials who voted for him in 2012 remains strong, among voters ages 18 to 24, 52 percent said they would support recalling the president, about the same number as would recall members of Congress, and 12 percent higher than the percentage of 25- to 29-year-old voters who would support recalling Obama.

The survey also found that self-identification with the Democratic Party among the 25- to 29-year-old group has remained flat at about 38 percent since 2009, while identification with the GOP has dropped about 8 percent to 22 percent. However, among younger millennials, self-identification with the Democratic Party has plummeted about 12 percent since 2009 to 31 percent, while identification with the GOP has risen slightly to 25 percent.

Also of concern to the Democratic Party is a finding that the number of young black voters who say they will vote in the next midterm election is down 12 percent from 2009.

On the issue of health care, 57 percent of millennial voters surveyed said they disapprove of Obamacare, and about half said they expected their expenses to rise under the law.

According to the survey’s demographic data, 33 percent of respondents consider themselves liberal, and the same number are Democrats. In a discrepancy that may be indicative of the GOP’s current troubles, however, only 24 percent are Republicans, but 37 percent consider themselves conservative. About 41 percent are Independents.

High student debt was a concern across parties and political leanings.

Taken as a whole, the Harvard survey paints a picture of a young and upcoming group of voters who are increasingly conservative, disdainful of President Obama and skeptical of both parties.

For conservatives tired of liberal politics ruling the day with the help of RINO lackeys, it could be a hopeful sign that there is a generation of independent thinkers coming up who could sway future elections.

But it may be bad news for the Republicans unless they can unload the country club elite who are running the party into the ground.