10 Commandments Stays at OK State Capital Says Judge


How many times over the past couple of decades have we seen one atheist group after another challenge our Christian heritage and force the removal of Christian symbolism from government and public places?

Perhaps one of the most notable cases involved the display of the 10 Commandments at the Alabama Supreme Court building. An atheist group sued to have it removed, but then Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore refused, claiming that they had historic value as well as demonstrated the Christian heritage of his state and nation. In November 2003, the state’s judicial ethics panel voted to remove Moore from his seat on the state’s Supreme Court. In 2012, Moore was re-elected by the people to be state’s Chief Justice.

Similar battles have raged in numerous states, counties and even cities. One by one the 10 Commandments and other Christian symbols have been removed as they were Alabama. That is until an Oklahoma County District Judge ruled that the 10 Commandments monument on the grounds of the state capital can stay.

In 2012, the monument, which was paid for with private money, went on display on the grounds of the state capital. A year later the Oklahoma chapter of the ACLU (I like to refer to them as the Anti-Christian Lawyers Union) filed a lawsuit to have the 10 Commandments monument removed, claiming it was unconstitutional. Not long afterward a Satanist group filed to get one of their statues on Capital grounds.

Due to the fact that there were a number of different monument and displays on the Capital grounds, Oklahoma County District Judge Thomas Prince ruled the 10 Commandments could stay since there were also a number of American Indian spiritual imagery displayed on a number of monuments. In his ruling, Prince wrote:

“Many of these monuments and plaques depict both the secular and spiritual history of Oklahoma.”

“In short, the evidence demonstrates that the Ten Commandments Monument is one of many monuments and works of art, all rich with symbolism (some religious), that dot the Capitol Grounds.”

Like in any such case, the ACLU has 30 days to appeal Prince’s decision and according to Brady Henderson, the legal director for the ACLU of Oklahoma they plan to file an appeal. Henderson commented:

“The plaintiffs in this case do not seek the removal of the Ten Commandments monument from the State Capitol lawn because they find the text of the monument offensive, but rather because … it is offensive to them that this sacred document has been hijacked by politicians.”

“We will appeal this decision and ask the Oklahoma Supreme Court to find that the Oklahoma Constitution does not give the government the power to cheapen inherently religious texts.”

Heaven forbid that they allow the public to see even a hint of our nation’s Christian heritage. They don’t seem to a have problem with Obama constantly referring to some mythical Muslim history in early America, but Christianity is strictly taboo.

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