3 in 4 Americans Support Religious Leaders Right to Defend Their Faith


Should ministers be allowed to preach what their religion teaches? This question has been a subject of debate lately as liberals wage a war on Christians.

One of the more recent examples is Houston’s lesbian mayor who subpoenaed the sermons and communications of some of the city’s more outspoken Christian pastors. If you recall, Mayor Parker passed a city ordinance giving LGBT people special privileges which allow men to use women’s bathrooms, showers and dressing rooms. When some of the Christian leaders in Houston started a petition to repeal her ordinance, Parker ignored the First Amendment rights of pastors and went after them with both barrels blazing.

After so much public outcry against her actions, she withdrew the original subpoena and issued a second one that just asked for all of their communications, but not their sermons. Parker’s goal is to charge the ministers with discrimination and hate language for teaching what the Bible says about homosexuality and how it is an abomination to God.

In the wake of this news, Rasmussen Reports did a national telephone survey to find out how the general public feels about a minister’s right to preach what their religion teaches. Their survey consisted of the five following questions:

1* Do religious leaders have too much influence on U.S. government policy, not enough influence or about the right amount of influence?

2*  Are religious leaders engaging in politics when they criticize government policies that violate the basic beliefs of their religion?

3*  Is it a hate crime when religious leaders criticize social policies such as gay marriage that violate the basic beliefs of their religion?

4*  Should the government be allowed to prosecute religious leaders for comments that criticize government and social policies that violate the basic beliefs of their religion?

5*  How important is your religious faith in your daily life – very important, somewhat important, not very important or not at all important?

In response to question 1, the results were evenly divided with 31% saying religious leaders have too much influence on government policy; 30% said they don’t have enough influence and another 30% said the level of influence is about where it should be.

In response to question 2, the results were again closely divided with 34% saying that religious leaders are engaging in politics when they criticize government policy; 40% said it’s not engaging in politics and 26% were not sure.

The response to question 3 was more divided than the first two with 63% responding that it’s not hate language for religious leaders to criticize things like gay marriage if it violates their faith; 24% said it is hate language and only 13% were undecided.

The response to question 4 was even more one sided with 77% of likely voters saying that government should not be allowed to prosecute religious leaders for their comments that criticize government and social policies that violate their faith and only 14% believed they should be prosecuted.

Lastly, the response to question 5 revealed that 52% of likely voters said their faith is Very Important in their daily life; 26% said it was important and 19% said faith is not important to their daily life. I find that many people say their faith is important to them, but they really don’t live like it is. I think it also reveals just how shallow, weak or compromised many people’s faith is.

If 78% of Americans lived like their faith was important to them in their daily life, America would still be a Christian nation and we wouldn’t be forced to embrace such sinful and abominable lifestyles such as homosexuality and promiscuous sex outside of marriage. We also wouldn’t have a Muslim occupying the White House and the most corrupt administration in American history.

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