ARE CHRISTIANS PARTLY TO BLAME FOR THE POLITICAL MESS WE’RE IN BECAUSE OF POOR THEOLOGICAL REASONING?


For nearly 40 years I have been writing and speaking on worldview issues from a biblical perspective that includes topics like politics, economics, ethics, and education. It’s been an uphill battle. Trying to convince Christians that they should get involved in these issues has gotten a lot of pushback, mostly from pastors.

A majority of Christians send their children to government (public) schools even though what these schools teach is diametrically opposed to what the Christian parents believe. Most Christians are content with a little bit of socialism, a clear violation of the Eighth Commandment. When it comes to politics, millions of Christians couldn’t be bothered. They’ve been told for decades that politics is not “spiritual.” Most pastors won’t touch the topic for fear of alienating members who may be socially and politically liberal.

Anyone who reads the whole Bible sees that it does not shy away from social, moral, and political realities. A pastor can’t claim to teach “the whole purpose of God” (Acts 20:27) while avoiding politics:

What is the relation of clergy and politics? Should men in the pulpit speak out on social and political questions, and, if so, under what circumstances? Answer: The clergy cannot faithfully expound the Word of God without dealing with virtually every social and political question. The Bible speaks not only about salvation but about God’s law with respect to the state, money, land, natural resources, just weights and measures, criminal law, and a variety of other subjects. The clergy are not to intermeddle in politics, but they must proclaim the Word of God. There is a difference: political intermeddling is a concern over partisan issues: preaching should be concerned with Biblical doctrines irrespective of persons and parties.”1

Politics is messy. King David was an adulterer and an accomplice to murder, and in his later years slept with a young woman to keep him warm, although he did not “know” her (1 Kings 1:1-4). “Know” is a euphemism for sexual relations (Gen. 4:1; 19:5-6; Judges 19:22, 25). Can you imagine a political candidate doing that today? “Well, she’s my nurse. I need her to keep me warm. Doctor’s orders.”

Solomon had multiple foreign wives, horses, weapons of war, and an accumulation of wealth, all in violation of the law regarding kings (I Kings 10; Deut. 17:14-20).

In 1 Kings 11, Solomon’s wives (hundreds of them: v. 3) turned his heart against God even though “the Lord had said to the sons of Israel, ‘You shall not associate with them, nor shall they associate with you, for they will surely turn your heart away after their gods’” (v. 2). As God warned, Solomon’s dalliances with foreign women would have long-term national repercussions:

“For Solomon went after Ashtoreth the goddess of the Sidonians and after Milcom the detestable idol of the Ammonites. Solomon did what was evil in the sight of the Lord, and did not follow the Lord fully, as David his father had done. Then Solomon built a high place for Chemosh the detestable idol of Moab, on the mountain which is east of Jerusalem, and for Molech the detestable idol of the sons of Ammon” (vv. 5-7).

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