Even Jimmy Carter Warning Democrats to Reel Back from Extreme Left


Former President Jimmy Carter was one of the most left-wing Democrats of his day, but even he is now saying that the Democrat Party has gone too far to the extreme left.

Carter is now warning the Democrat Party to steer back toward the center and away from the far left, socialist-styled candidates who have swamped the Democrat primaries this year.

The Georgian is worried that independents, and center-leaning Democrats will think they are unwelcome in the increasingly left-wing party.

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As LifeZette reported:

“Independents need to know they can invest their vote in the Democratic Party,” Carter said, while delivering his annual report at The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum in Atlanta, according to the Associated Press.

Even though Carter backed Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) in the 2016 Democratic presidential primaries, he urged Democrats to avoid moving “to a very liberal program, like universal health care,” if they’re still trying to appeal to moderate voters dissatisfied with both President Donald Trump’s policies and far-Left ideology.

The former president also dismissed Democratic lawmakers’ and candidates’ concerns that they would lose the progressive wing of their base if they espoused more moderate policies, saying, “I don’t think any Democrat is going to vote against a Democratic nominee.”

The AP noted that “there is some historical irony in Carter’s analysis” because of his presidential re-election loss to Ronald Reagan in 1980. Carter, widely viewed as a moderate Democrat, faced a 1980 Democratic primary challenge from former Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.), who was backed by the party’s more liberal wing. Carter struggled to rally those voters after he defeated Kennedy.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R, CA) echoed Carter’s worries saying that far-left policies offered by the Democrat Party’s rising crop of primary winners is a dangerous path and he thinks they will stick with the increasingly erratic Nancy Pelosi for Speaker if they regain power in the House of Representatives.

“The reason why I think they would elect Nancy — because remember who is winning in the primaries. The socialists are, and that’s much more aligned with where Nancy is, in San Francisco, than where the rest of the nation is,” McCarthy said.

“Well, that should scare all Americans. If Democrats were to win the majority, I believe Nancy would be speaker,” McCarthy said.

Several extreme, left-wing Democrats have mad the news this year including New York Congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Florida candidate for governor Robert Gillum, and New York Senate candidate Julia Salazar.

But these candidates only come on the heels of the most famous socialist of his day, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who garnered millions of followers when he ran against Hillary Clinton for the 2016 Democrat Party nomination for president.

Socialists and communists are responsible for more oppression, destruction, and death than any other human ideologies — including religion. So, Carter is right. We need to steer well clear of socialism.

Follow Warner Todd Huston on Twitter @warnerthuston.

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