Giving DNA To A Genealogy Website Can Help You Find Long-Lost Relatives… Or Help Catch A Killer


Taking a personal DNA testing could help catch a murderer.

Specialists are using public-access DNA databases to track down violent criminals like the notorious Golden State Killer Joseph James DeAngelo. But the technique is raising a host of legal and ethical questions.

I can, however, see potential problems especially in regards to health or life insurance. Who is to say the companies won’t acquire your DNA data and make you pay more because you have some genetic probability for cancer, heart disease or something else?

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Washington Times:

A woman researching her ancestry submitted her DNA to a genealogy website — and ended up leading police to her half brother, who left his DNA at a crime scene decades ago.

Raymond Charles Rowe pleaded guilty this year to the 1992 rape and murder of Christy Mirack, a Pennsylvania schoolteacher.

It has become a surprisingly common story in recent years as more Americans put their genetic materials into the public domain, allowing police some access.

Authorities said one company helped solve nearly 30 cold cases from May to December using DNA profiles submitted to genealogy sites and made available for public matching.

The work is conducted at places such as Parabon NanoLabs, where CeCe Moore and other genetic genealogists take crime scene DNA turned over by police and run it against profiles from 23andMe, Ancestry.com or other sites made public on GEDmatch by consumers looking for relatives they didn’t know existed.

In successful cases, Parabon is able to identify a narrow list of potential leads.

“I can point them to as few people as possible,” Ms. Moore told The Washington Times. “It’s really the strength of this process that we can help them zero in on just a handful or sometimes one person rather than having innocent people pulled into the investigation.”  More

I had my DNA tested on two of the sites looking to see if I could find out who is my mother’s birth parents are and they are more than welcomed to use it to identify and prosecute criminals.

If you have nothing to hide then you have nothing to worry about. I love my family but if someone in my family was guilty of murder then they should be held accountable.

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