Rick Santorum Makes a Point that Makes Liberal Heads Spin


Rick Santorum was on CBS’ Face the Nation to discuss the ongoing religious liberty debate when he made a point that had the Internet exploding with commentary. In discussing what the various Religious Freedom Restoration Acts do and do not do, Indiana’s latest attempt at assuaging liberals was brought up. The newest Indiana bill does not provide protection to religious business owners who might have convictions against gay marriage, to which Santorum replied, “tolerance is a two way street.”

 

“Tolerance is a two way street, if you’re a print shop and you are a gay man, should you be forced to print ‘God hates fags’ for the Westboro Baptist church, because they hold those signs up. Should the government force you to do that? That’s what these cases are all about. This is about the government coming in and saying, ‘No, we’re going to make you do this.’ We need some space to say let’s have tolerance should be a two way street.”

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Exactly. How is forcing people to act against their religious convictions not a form of bigotry in and of itself? Tolerance should certainly be a two way street.

 

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